Exterior Lamp Post

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  #1  
Old 04-18-05, 06:58 AM
briante
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Cool Exterior Lamp Post

I am looking into installing a lamp post out by our driveway. Currently we have an outlet mounted outside that is controlled by a switch inside the front door. I need to know the proper way to wire up the light.

Here is what I thinking of doing:

I was going to attach grey plastic condiut to the outlet box, run it down the wall and into the ground, then run it out to where the post is going to go. In the condiut i was going to run 3 single conductor 15g wires tied in to the outlet and run to the post.

Questions:
Is this the proper way to do this?
Does anyone have any tips on doing this?
How deep should I bury the condiut (it is going to be under a new flower bed)?
What size condiut should I use?

Thanks for all your help,
Brian
 
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  #2  
Old 04-18-05, 07:05 AM
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Why use conduit? There is no need to.

Use direct burial UF-B wire. Use 12 gauge if this is a 20 amp circuit, or 14 gauge if this is a 15 amp circuit. Use a piece of cinduit to protect the wire down the side of the house, but other than that just bury it 18 inches deep or more. If the receptacle is not already a GFCI recpetacle then install one and wire the light on the LOAD terminals of the GFCI receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-05, 07:13 AM
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Conduit is required while above ground and down to the bottom of the trench. After that, you can just direct bury the UF-B cable. If the cable comes off the load side of a GFCI receptacle or breaker before going into the ground, minimum burial depth is 12 inches.

For the part going under the flower bed, where it might be subject to occasional digging, I'd use conduit for that part too.

Don't put the cable in the conduit until the PVC glue has fully cured. Use large enough conduit so that it's not a struggle to get the cable in.

If you prefer, you can also use single conductors in conduit all the way.
 
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Old 04-18-05, 07:16 AM
briante
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Smile

Originally Posted by racraft
Why use conduit? There is no need to.

Use direct burial UF-B wire. Use 12 gauge if this is a 20 amp circuit, or 14 gauge if this is a 15 amp circuit. Use a piece of cinduit to protect the wire down the side of the house, but other than that just bury it 18 inches deep or more. If the receptacle is not already a GFCI recpetacle then install one and wire the light on the LOAD terminals of the GFCI receptacle.
Thanks for the quick response!

I thought I needed to use condiut in the ground. That is great, that I don't. What size condiut should I use to secure it against the wall, or doesn't it matter?

Thanks again,
Brian
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-05, 07:30 AM
briante
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
Conduit is required while above ground and down to the bottom of the trench. After that, you can just direct bury the UF-B cable. If the cable comes off the load side of a GFCI receptacle or breaker before going into the ground, minimum burial depth is 12 inches.

For the part going under the flower bed, where it might be subject to occasional digging, I'd use conduit for that part too.

Don't put the cable in the conduit until the PVC glue has fully cured. Use large enough conduit so that it's not a struggle to get the cable in.

If you prefer, you can also use single conductors in conduit all the way.
John,

You bring up a good point about the garden. Unfortunately the entire length that I need to run the wire to, is under a garden. So I guess I should go back to my original plan. I believe the circuit is 15 amp, so I'll use 14g single conductor wire in conduit at least 18 inches deep. I'm going to install a GFCI outlet inplace of the current one, and run the wires off the LOAD side. I won't run the wires through until the glue dries.

What should I do at the light post end of the condiut? Should I run the conduit partially up the inside of the lightpost before I concrete it in? Whats the best way to keep moisture out?

Thanks,
Brian
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-05, 07:37 AM
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I suggested 18 inches deep so as to be deep enough to avoid possible damage from the garden. I figured that 18 inches is deep enough where you won't be running into the wire. You can always go deeper.

If you plan on using conduit all the way, then I would run individual wires, as you originally proposed. However, if you want to avoid the conduit (at the bottom of the trench) then go deep enough where you won't dig into the wires.

And make sure that you use a GFCI receptacle, so that if you do accidentally damage the wires that you don't damage yourself at the same time.
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-05, 07:38 AM
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Yes, it is typical to run the conduit up into the base of the post before you pour the concrete. You can't keep moisture out--don't even try.
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-05, 11:45 AM
briante
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Solid or Stranded

Should I use solid or stranded wire for this? I went to the store during lunch and saw that they had both. Is one better than the other? Is one easier to work with than the other?

Thanks,
Brian
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-05, 12:16 PM
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Stranded wire does better with twists, turns and bends in the conduit, but is trickier to connect to screw terminals as the strands tend to spread out. Also you have to be careful stripping the end of the wire as you may strip off some of the strands.

Solid wires is harder to get around bends and turns in the conduit but is easier to strip and easier to connect to a screw terminal.
 
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