wiring to garage

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  #1  
Old 04-18-05, 11:04 AM
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wiring to garage

I am running electric to a detached garage from a 60 amp breaker in main panel to a 100 amp panel with a main breaker. I used 70' of #4 cable type se style ser xhhw. I was told by an electrician and the guy at supply house that this cable could be buried, so I did so. Now I see online that this is meant for above ground se. I buried it in 1 1/4 pvc conduit, which now I'm not sure that was the right thing to do either.any opinions?
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Old 04-18-05, 11:15 AM
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hi
If your house is equip with 60 amp you cant run a 100 amps to the garage

pg
 
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Old 04-18-05, 11:22 AM
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House service is 150 amps. Ran a 60 amp dbl pole breaker to garage.Going to be running an air compressor,lights,radio and saws drills etc.The compressor and tools will only be run one at atime.
 
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Old 04-18-05, 11:30 AM
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Whwre are you reading that this cable cannot be used underground? I can't find that listed on any of the web sites I have consulted.
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-05, 11:47 AM
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Ser is above ground, user in below ground. If it's run in conduit all the way I see no problem, as a matter of fact single conductors would have been cheaper.
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-05, 09:05 PM
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One of the manufacters listed it as above ground, don't remember what name.Individual wires would have been alot easier to get through conduit also. Ihave acouple questions on how to wire the panel
1)do I need to put in a ground rod and run a wire from panel to it?
2)do I connect ground and neutral to the same spot on neutral buss?
3)either hot wire can go to either side of main breaker in garage panel, these wires aren't phased or anything like that, correct.
4)panel came with 20 amp breakers, can I use these for cicuits for flourescent lights and wall outletsthat say 15 amps.
sorry so many questions, thanks alot for all the help
 
  #7  
Old 04-19-05, 04:29 AM
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1. Yes, you probably need a ground rod. In fact probably two of them.

2. No. The ground and neutral must be isolated in this sub panel. You should have four wires from the main panel to the sub panel.

3. Either hot wire can go to either "side" of the sub panel.

4. Yes, you can put 15 amp devices on 20 amp breakers in the US. You must, however, use 12 gage wire for the wiring.

Please buy and read at least one book, probably more, on this before you start. There are other things you need to know.
 
  #8  
Old 04-19-05, 05:32 PM
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can you recomend a good straight to the point book or website?Some books can get too far into the engineering part of it and make it more confusing.I'm used to 12 and 24 v dc systems...no ground=no circuit.Should I connect ground rod to ground buss in panel and ground wire in cable from main to ground buss in sub panel.
Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 04-20-05, 04:56 AM
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Originally Posted by searaysrv
I'm used to 12 and 24 v dc systems...no ground=no circuit.
Be careful with that; AC and DC power systems are entirely different beasts. Don't assume that knowledge about DC will translate to AC, because it probably won't. For example, in AC power, the ground conductor is NOT part of the circuit; it is there mostly for lightning protection and safety.
 
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