Gound wire questions

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Old 04-22-05, 04:35 AM
lousahr
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Gound wire questions

1. I have 2 existing ground wires coming into my outlet and they are screwed to the back of the metal box. I am adding another outlet downstream from this box and I want to know if I can just attach the new ground wire to the green screw on the recepticle or do I have to pid tie it to the existing ground wires and then attach it to BOTH the box screw and the green outlet screw?

2. I have an oulet where the ground wire is atached to the ground screw and my my tester is telling me the ground wire is hot. What does this mean?
 
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Old 04-22-05, 05:00 AM
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1. All ground wires should be connected together, and pigtailed to the receptacles and/or switches in the box, and connected to the metal box. There are certain types of switches and receptacles that are self grounding, but this feature sometimes fails and should not be relied on. It should also not be used for carrying the ground through to an outgoing wire.

2. You are testing incorrectly. Describe your test procedure.
 
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Old 04-22-05, 06:50 AM
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If two ground wires are coming into the box, you should add two bare grounds of about 6" each and then pigtail all four of them in one wire nut. One of the short pieces goes under the box grounding screw, and one goes on the receptacle's grounding screw. If you are extending the circuit to more receptacles, connect the ground to those receptacles in with the other four, all in one wire nut.

The way to test if a ground has live juice on it is to put one test lead on that ground, and the other test lead on something else you know is grounded, such as a water pipe, furnace register, or a ground on a receptacle that is definitely on a separate circuit from the one you suspect is hot. If you see voltage, that ground is hot and it can be a real chore to find where it is that somebody screwed up. Also, if hot to neutral shows voltage but hot to that ground does not, that ground is probably hot. But it could also mean that somebody switched hot and neutral, and your neutral is hot and your hot is neutral. If your hot is neutral, it will not show voltage from it to ground because they are bonded together in your (main) panel.

Hope that helps.

Juice
 
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Old 04-23-05, 03:46 AM
lousahr
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Thanks to all. Issue resolved. Tab was snapped off recepticle.
 
  #5  
Old 04-23-05, 03:58 AM
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Yeppers....this is were the Ideal 65-155 comes in nice and handy. We check all recepts with the unit to ensure correct wiring. When I go to a job my crew has done and I did not do..call me parinoid but I always click in the tester and check it......LOVE my Ideal 65-155 tester....Never leave a job without it...
 
  #6  
Old 04-25-05, 06:55 AM
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I've never heard of an Ideal 65-155 tester. (I always use a Sperry DSA-600 for all my testing.) Can you describe it? Sounds like something I might like to add to my collection.

Juice
 
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