Pulling power from a light fixture?

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  #1  
Old 04-23-05, 06:01 PM
digimon
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Exclamation Pulling power from a light fixture?

Hi... any help would be great.
Last year I installed 6 recessed lights in my living room, I would like to take power from that circuit to install recessed lights in my kitchen. But I don't want them switched by the livingroom switch. I want them to be on a different switch because it is another room.

Where and how should I make the connection?
Should it be at the end of the run in the attic? At the switch? or at a junction box in the basement?
How would I connect it since I want it switched? and I don't want to living room dimmer to control the kitchen lights?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-23-05, 07:10 PM
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You join at the "J" box, however, what is the breaker size and the wire size and the wattage of the lamps on the existing fixtures.
 
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Old 04-23-05, 11:55 PM
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Where to make the connection depends on how you wired the first circuit. Where do you have unswitched power? If you have unswitched power at the switch then you might connect there. If you only have a switch loop at the switch then you cannot connect there.
 
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Old 04-24-05, 01:46 PM
digimon
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Originally Posted by Snoonyb
You join at the "J" box, however, what is the breaker size and the wire size and the wattage of the lamps on the existing fixtures.
The breaker size is 20 amp and the wire is 12-3. I ran 4-75 watt on one switch and 2- 50 watt wall washers on another switch. "J" box in the basement about 5 feet away from panel.
With 20 amp I should have enough watts ... with only 400 being used at one time. Would like to add about 500 more watts to it. ??
 
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Old 04-24-05, 01:53 PM
digimon
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Originally Posted by racraft
Where to make the connection depends on how you wired the first circuit. Where do you have unswitched power? If you have unswitched power at the switch then you might connect there. If you only have a switch loop at the switch then you cannot connect there.
I connected at the panel then came out and put a junction box where I connected the second wire both went up thru a wall to where I connected a dimmer switch to each then up to the attic where I put the cans .... 6 in all.
2-50 watt wall washers then 4-75 watt recessed cans.
Not sure what a switch loop is. but I believe that my only unswitched power is in the wall from the switch to the basement and to the box.

So I'll probably have to connect there at that box right?

Thanks for the help.
 
  #6  
Old 04-24-05, 02:36 PM
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The switch loop is those items switched.
Depending upon the proximaty of the existing switch and the proposed switch, you can continue the hot pair to the new switch. If that is the lesser route and the existing switch box is large enough to accomadate the extra conductors.
Use a metal box when dimmers are contemplated, they aide in heat disipation.
 
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Old 04-24-05, 03:01 PM
digimon
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Originally Posted by Snoonyb
The switch loop is those items switched.
Depending upon the proximaty of the existing switch and the proposed switch, you can continue the hot pair to the new switch. If that is the lesser route and the existing switch box is large enough to accomadate the extra conductors.
Use a metal box when dimmers are contemplated, they aide in heat disipation.
The new switch will be about 5 inches away from the existing one on the other side of the wall. That box should be large enough to handle one more connection. It currently has two slide dimmers in it and the new one have one. So I can just connect right on the back of that dimmer box to one of the existing dimmers. That makes it a lot easier then originally thought. Thanks
 
  #8  
Old 04-24-05, 03:22 PM
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A switch loop is a single cable that goes from the the device to be switched to the switch. A switch loop contains no neutral.

You do not have a switch loop. You have power going to the switch, and then switched power going to the lights. You must connect at the switch in order to get unswitched power for your new lights.

Not related to your question, but I think you may be mistaking 12-2 with ground for 12-3. 12-3 cable has three shielded conductors and one ground. 12-2 has two shielded conductors and one ground.
 
  #9  
Old 04-24-05, 04:05 PM
digimon
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Your right ... I did mistake the wire .. I have 12-2 ... 2 wire and a ground.
Thanks for the help.
 
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