Is this okay in a kitchen?

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  #1  
Old 04-26-05, 03:10 PM
saerandy
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Is this okay in a kitchen?

See photo here: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projec...ges/el04gf.jpg

I ask because someone indicated that if done in a bathroom it had to be on separate circuits.

I was considering having an electrician come in and use the power from an existing GFI outlet to power some under counter lights. After adding the switch to control the lights, it would be like this.

Could this be a code violation?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-26-05, 03:30 PM
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You cannot have kitchen lighting on the same circuit as the counter receptacles. My understanding is that this applies to all lights, regular ceiling and under cabinet.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 01:59 AM
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Sae,

The image you list is not a violation in nature of the setup. The code issue is not with having a GFCI and a Light Switch in the same work box but I think your question is you want to TAP the GFCI circuit and add lights on which is not allowed per code.....you can't put lighting on that GFCI on the kitchen counter....

Do you have access to the kitchen from under the kitchen ( basement ) or above ( attic ).....if you simply feed the lighting from those options and try to find a available source or run a new line but the picture you show is not in itself a violation of anything.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ElectricalMan
......the picture you show is not in itself a violation of anything.
What about the lack of a coverplate?
 
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Old 04-28-05, 07:27 AM
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Cover plate of course is required. An uncovered box with electrical wiring in it is a code violation.

The NEC says that the kitchen must be served with two 20 amp small appliance branch circuits, which serve receptacles only in the kitchen, pantry and dining areas, and no other rooms. It can also have no lighting on this circuit. This pertains to the NEC editions of at least the past ten years, and probably longer, althoughI'm not sure how far back. Kitchens built and wired prior to this requirement are grandfathered. So it depends on how old your kitchen wiring is. It may have been up to code at the time and if left that way it would be allowed today. However, if you modify or extend this circuit it would have to be brought up to today's code, technically.

Hope that helps.

Juice
 
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Old 04-28-05, 02:59 PM
saerandy
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Thanks Juice!

So, this means we'll have to drop a wire down in to the crawl space and find a circuit not serving the dining room or kitchen outlets to get power from. Shouldn't be too hard as the family room is a hop, skip, and a jump from the kitchen.

And I'm sure we'll put on a coverplate.
 
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Old 04-29-05, 06:19 AM
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Glad to help. Good luck. Juice
 
  #8  
Old 05-01-05, 03:24 AM
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coverplate.....oh come ON guys..........You all know I was refering to the configuration....GEESSSHHHHHH........get real...lol
 
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Old 05-01-05, 12:21 PM
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Just yankin' yer chain EMan, lol
 
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Old 05-02-05, 02:01 AM
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lol....I know.....just jerking it back at ya...lol.......thehehe
 
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