Pool Wiring

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  #1  
Old 04-30-05, 12:28 PM
midnightflyer10
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Pool Wiring

Hi Folks, Glad to have found this forum. I have put up a pool in the back yard and am at this time running a 10/2 outdoor line laying on the ground until I can get the proper wiring installed (wife needs to use the pool and I need to sleep) my question is this , I want to put the wiring underground and probably in conduit, The total run would be 130 ft and I want to run 220 volts as we are at a later date going to put a hot tub out there on the deck and the one we're looking at are 220 volt, I need to know what size and type of wiring I should be looking at, I'm going to be doing the grunt work ie diging the trench,running wire and then get a certified electrician to do the hook ups. Any help or thoughts would be of great help......Terry
 
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Old 04-30-05, 12:52 PM
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A pool requires a dedicated circuit. You will have to install a sub panel at the deck and run the pool off the sub panel.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 01:16 PM
midnightflyer10
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racraft, Thanks for the reply, I knew I'd leave out some info pertaining to my question, I do intend to make it a dedicated circuit and planned to put a pannel out there that will be enclosed to protect it from the elements and splashing water,I am keenly aware of the hazards of water and electricity and will not put any of us at rist in that matter. And a follow up question direct burial or conduit and wire type and size?
 
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Old 04-30-05, 01:16 PM
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Is this an above ground pool? If not you may want to consult the electrician first since there are numerous codes to take into consideration for a permanet pool.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 01:24 PM
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Wink

You dont say What the amp draw on the pool pump is or any lights on it. Then what is the amp draw for the hot tub Going to be just 220 V dont cut it.

ED
 
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Old 04-30-05, 01:37 PM
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An above ground pool is also a permanent pool. The pool requires a 20 amp dedicated circuit. What you may need in the future for the hot tub depends on the hot tub.

The wiring for the pool must be run in conduit, and must be individual conductors.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 02:25 PM
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In that case, you'll also need a 15 or 20-amp GFCI protected receptacle between 10 and 20 ft (not less than 10, not more than 20) from the edge of the pool.
 
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Old 04-30-05, 03:05 PM
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There are many, many involved codes with regard to pools. The old addage; "I'll do the grunt work and an electrician will do the 'hookups'" is a very ambiguous statement.
There is more to the "hookups" than you can ever imagine.

This will need a sub-panel of at least 60 amps. Every 220 volt package spa I have done in recent time was either a 40, 50, or 60 amp circuit.
The pool pump circuit MUST be in conduit. If it is close to the pool (no closer than 5') there are special rules. The general use receptalce between 10'-20', like was mentioned. Bonding of all related metal parts and everything within 5' of the pool. These are all important things to consider, and that's just the beginning.

It really is not as simple as just running the conduit for the electrician.But that is a good place to start.
I strongly suggest you get a QUALIFIED electrician, who is familiar with pools, to do a walk through so you can see what is needed so no costly mistakes are amde.
 
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Old 05-01-05, 12:45 AM
midnightflyer10
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Thanks to all of you, This forum opened my eyes, There is more to consider than I thought, I will consult an electrician before I try to do anything, I'm sure after getting the requirements from him that I can still do some of the work and save a few bucks, Besides I realy want to bring the trencher home from work and tear up my back yard Thanks again, I'm sure I'll be back.....Terry
 
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Old 05-01-05, 07:51 AM
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Try to design a system where the necessary control and protective components are in-doors instead of out-doors, exposed to rain and moisture. Far easier to service such components in a in-door location.

For example, if you will operate with a time-controlled filter-pump, locate the timer and a GFI protective-device in-doors-- all you need at the pump-motor is a dis-connect which is used only when the pump-motor is being worked on.If you need a "general-purpose" 120 volt receptacle-outlet adjacent to the pool, protect the receptacle with an in-door GFI circuit-breaker.

THE most important aspect of pools is Grounding techniques for maximum saftey.Take advantage of the trench by driving two Ground-rods in the bottom of the trench for maximum depth. Inter-connect the rods with bare stranded copper wire laid along the trench- the more copper exposed to the underground soil, the better.

At the pool you will "Bond" together the Grounding Electrode Conductor laid in the trench, all Branch-Circuit Equiptment Grounding Conductors, and all metallic sufaces they may conduct electricity if accidentaly connected to a "live" ( un-grounded) circuit-conductor.

If the entire Grounding-system relies on a single Equiptment Grounding Conductor, and there is a "break" in the EGC at a termination , there will be a shock-hazard in effect.Best to install a "redundant" Grounding-path for maximum saftey.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Old 05-01-05, 12:29 PM
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PATTBAA, I am curious as to why you would drive two ground rods for a pool. This is not required and in fact I suggest against it. The bonding requirement is so that there is an equal ground plane with no potential for voltage gradients and also to assure all the metallic parts associated with the pool are bonded to any electrically grounded equipment. 680.26(A)FPN

Also, the required #8 copper for bonding MUST be solid, not stranded. 680.26
 
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Old 05-01-05, 08:57 PM
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I just wanted to add a couple things to what Speedy Pete said. Bonding requirements for pools are seperate and distinct from grounding electrode and equipment grounding requirements. Voltage gradients as low as 4 volts can be very harmful. In the ear, they can cause disorientation which may lead to drowning.
 
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Old 05-02-05, 12:19 PM
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What I suggest is not a "Bonding" conductor but a Grounding Electrode Conductor which is "redundant" Grounding protection, the purpose being to keep all metallic surfaces at Ground-potential should there be a "break" in the Equiptment Grounding Conductor.It is to be understood that such a Ground is NOT a path for Fault-currents.

Art. 250.54 , Supplementary Grounding Electrodes, permits this Grounding technique, The Art reads----- "Supplementary Grounding Electrodes shall be permitted to be connected to the (required) Equiptment Grounding Conductors---"
 
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