Grounding a Non Ground Receptacle

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Old 05-06-05, 01:22 PM
hth
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Grounding a Non Ground Receptacle

My house was built in 1961. All receptacle in bedrooms are fed with cable of a black and a white, no ground. I really need to ground the receptacles in my bedroom where I use my computers. Recently I upgraded the service with a 200A panel. The ground system was installed by an electrician with one rod driven into the ground right below the new panel. From here one #4 wire goes to the panel; another #4 wire goes through the attic and tied into the copper water pipe where it (the water pipe) entered the house. Both ground wires are protected and the whole job was inspected by the city. I am thinking of splitting the #4 ground wire in the attic, wire nut and put it in a j-box. Then I will try to fish a #12 green wire from the receptacles in my office to the attic and pig tail it to the #4 ground wire in the j-box. Is it OK to do this way? Any other easier way you can help with? Thx.
 
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Old 05-06-05, 02:58 PM
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The best thing to do would be to install a new grounded receptacle on a new circuit just for your computer. With your 200A panel, you should have plenty of breaker slots open for a circuit.
 
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Old 05-06-05, 03:25 PM
hth
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Thanks.
However with the way I plan to do, is it acceptable with an inspector?
 
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Old 05-06-05, 06:53 PM
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I can't say what your inspector will tell you, but when I asked about doing something similar to add a ground for my old 3 wire dryer circuit, he said no, that I should run it new instead.

I second the advise to run the new circuit. I note that you said computers, so you are talking about multiple machines that definately need a good ground. This also assures that you do not add much additional load on the existing circuit. Fishing a 12-2 romex shouldn't be much harder than fishing a single #12 wire.
 
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Old 05-06-05, 07:32 PM
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The #4 wire to which you refer is called a Grounding Electrode Conductor. You are not permitted to use a wire nut on it. You may attach your outlet Equipment Grounding Conductor to it, but you must do it without cutting it.
 
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Old 05-06-05, 09:05 PM
hth
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Thanks all, gentlemen.
 
  #7  
Old 05-07-05, 07:33 AM
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hth,

When John says attach to it he means with a Split Bolt connector so that you may tapp onto it without actually cutting the EGC itself and is acceptable.
 
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