need some help installing a GFCI in my shed

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  #1  
Old 05-08-05, 11:49 AM
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need some help installing a GFCI in my shed

My house has a shed in the backyard that has an outlet in it that doesnt have ground fault protection. I bought a GFCI outlet to swap out what is currently in there.

There are 2 problems I'm having though, one, the metal box is too small to fit the GFCI outlet in with all the wires in the box so I believe first I'll need to replace the box with a bigger one. I'm hoping that isnt too big of a task which I dont think it should be because the box is just attached to a stud in the shed.

The second issue I have is how to wire everything up. The line coming into the outlet from the house has 4 wires, gound, neutral, black and a red. The red wire is spliced to a black wire that feeds an external security light attached to the shed so it bypasses the outlet altogether and the switch is located in my house. Also feeding off the outlet is a light switch in the shed.

This all being the case, the current outlet has a ground wire attached to it, 2 (black) hot wires, and 3 (white) neutral wires.

The GFCI outlet I have has backwire connectors (the type you put a wire in and tighten down with the side screw) so I can connect 2 wires to each line and load side post. Currently I connected the load side black and white wires to the line side of the GFCI and the other 2 white wires and the remaining black wire to the load side. This configuration seems to work though it puts my shed interior light and the outside security light on GFCI protection which I'd rather not do since if the outlet trips I lose lights.

When I get the bigger outlet box should I just pigtail the 3 neutral wires and connect all the connections to the line side?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-08-05, 04:24 PM
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The receptacle in the shed might be GFCI protected even if it isn't a GFCI receptacle. In fact, that would be the common way to do it, because if you provide GFCI protection in the house it greatly reduces the required burian depth of the cable. A simple $8 outlet tester can tell you if it is already GFCI protected.

If not, it is trivial to replace the box with a bigger one. It'll cost about 50 cents and take 50 seconds.

As long as you have GFCI protection for all receptacles, you don't need it for lights. So yes, you can pigtail to the line side.
 
  #3  
Old 05-08-05, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
The receptacle in the shed might be GFCI protected even if it isn't a GFCI receptacle. In fact, that would be the common way to do it, because if you provide GFCI protection in the house it greatly reduces the required burian depth of the cable. A simple $8 outlet tester can tell you if it is already GFCI protected.
I've already tested the outlet with a GFCI tester and confirmed there isnt GFCI protection anywhere else on the circuit.
 
  #4  
Old 05-08-05, 05:47 PM
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Connect all of the wires that were previously on the receptacle to the line side of the GFCI.
 
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