The difference between a 220 wire and a 110 wire.

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  #1  
Old 05-11-05, 01:41 PM
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Question The difference between a 220 wire and a 110 wire.

I would like to know the difference between a 220 wire and 110 wire. I just want to know what they look like, how many more wires, and what color they are. I'm a novice at all this.
Thanks,
Lorraine
 
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  #2  
Old 05-11-05, 01:43 PM
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They may look exactly the same when looking at the cable and wire. They should look different when looking at the breaker and receptacle.

Tell us more about what you are looking at, where and why.
 
  #3  
Old 05-11-05, 01:53 PM
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You can't tell just by looking at a cable if its used for 110 or 220. Many times the same cable can be used for either. For instance, 12-2wg is usually used for 110V, but can be used for 220V as well (I'll be using some 12-2wg for run to a 220V receptical for a radial arm saw when I get around to it).

Some people assume that if a wire has white insulation, it must be a neutral. However, when 12-2wg (or 10-2wg, etc) is used for 220V, the black and white are both hot, and there is no neutral.

The only way to tell for sure what a cable is being used for is to look at how it is connected to the breaker/fuse box.

Now if you see a real FAT cable with heavy guage wire in it, chances are its being used for 220V (though this is NOT definate). 6-3wg is pretty common to supply 220V to a range, though legit uses for it at 110V probably exist.
 
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Old 05-11-05, 02:04 PM
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On the number of wires, they can each vary. In these examples, I am counting the ground wire, though it is often not counted (ie, "12-2" romex used today actually has three wires if you count the ground):

220V, no ground, no neutral = 2 wires (not very common, but could be seen in old installations)
220V, no ground = 3 wires (old rangeor dryer circuits)
220V, no neutral = 3 wires (pure 220V items such as a motor)
220V with ground AND neutral = 4 wires (todays range or dryer circuits)

110V no ground = 2 wires (common in old houses)
110V with ground = 3 wires
110V multi-wire circuit = 4 wires (basically two 110V circuits sharing a neutral...not too common in homes, but used occasionally, and should only be done by those who know the details of how to do it right)
 
  #5  
Old 05-12-05, 04:26 AM
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My husband and father are hooking up a table saw. Can anyone draw a diagram, or send me to a site where, I can see the proper hook up? Also can it be hooked to a 30amp single breaker?
Thank you for all your help.
Lorraine
 
  #6  
Old 05-12-05, 04:30 AM
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Your question is too vague. IS this a 120 volt table saw? 240 volt? What are the current requirements?
 
  #7  
Old 05-12-05, 06:54 AM
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Post all the electrical information on the saw itself. There should be a metal plate with the specifications somewhere on the saw. Copy it all down and post it.
 
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