Ground wire question

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  #1  
Old 05-12-05, 09:02 PM
digimon
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Question Ground wire question

I have been working on my kitchen and have come across a switch box that just does'nt seem right.
My house is mostly 2 wire. This box has a 2 wire with a separate ground, 2 12-2 wires coming in, one switch and a plastic box. The ground wires are all wired together, same with white and the black has 2 wires connected to the bottom and one on the top.

The question is ... is this switch with the separate ground wire connected to all the other ground wires in a plastic box ok ????????

This is why I am thinking it is not.
On the other side of the room there is a GFCI receptacle that has a 2 wire and a separate ground but it is tied to a metal box. The ground is pigtailed to the ground and connected to the box in the back???

Then ......

I don't get this.... I also have 2 GFCI's with an open ground (Plug in tester). When I took them out to look they only have 2 wire and the ground wire on each are connected to the white wire screw (these are tied together they do click off when I press test). Then there are 2 other GFCI's that are totally on separate circuits. One of those are the metal box that I mentioned earlier. And the other has a switch on it (which I haven't even looked at that one yet) But when I test it, it doesn't kill the other. ...... to the right.

Any help would be great ....
 
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  #2  
Old 05-13-05, 05:24 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
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I'll try to address your questions, but I'm having a hard time following them.

One way to correct old wiring that has no ground is to run a separate ground wire. This ground wire must be the same size as the other wires (12 gage in this case), and should go back to the main panel and connect to the other ground wires. People will argue if it okay or not to run the wire to a properly grounded receptacle and connect to that receptacle's ground. This was quite common years ago, and my kitchen had some circuits wired this way.

It is possible that the extra ground wire you see at this switch goes to another receptacle, or possibly even brings the ground in to this circuit.

"On the other side of the room there is a GFCI receptacle that has a 2 wire and a separate ground but it is tied to a metal box. The ground is pigtailed to the ground and connected to the box in the back??? "

There is nothing wrong with the above setup, as long as the ground is connected properly somewhere. If this is the other end of the wire to the switch then it may very well be grounded.

Ground wires should NEVER be connected to the white neutral wires at receptacles or switches. This is a very unsafe situation and you should correct it. If these GFCIs were added as replacements to ungrounded receptacles then it is okay for them to be ungrounded. Just remove the ground wire connected to the neutral wires.

A GFCI receptacle will work properly (and test okay with the internal test button) if it not grounded. They won't work with an external GFCI tester unless you provide a proper ground.

In order for a GFCI to provide protection for other receptacles on the circuit, the other receptacles must be connected to the load side of the GFCI. If all the wires connect to the line side of the GFCI then you only have GFCI protection at the GFCI receptacle itself.
 
  #3  
Old 05-13-05, 05:55 PM
digimon
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Thanks for the reply.....
I corrected the ground wires that were connected to the neutral white wires.
Thanks for the help!
 
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