Service Panel Installation technique

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  #1  
Old 05-18-05, 07:36 AM
scott e.'s Avatar
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Service Panel Installation technique

Just curious, when installing a service or subpanel, is it prefered to run the branch wires in the panel to a point level with the desired connection point and then 90 strainght over to the connection point? Or is it prefered to leave extra wire by looping past the connection point and then come back from the opposite direction?
 
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Old 05-18-05, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by scott e.
Just curious, when installing a service or subpanel, is it prefered to run the branch wires in the panel to a point level with the desired connection point and then 90 strainght over to the connection point? Or is it prefered to leave extra wire by looping past the connection point and then come back from the opposite direction?
Don't put sharp bends in the wire, i.e. 90 deg., it damages the insulation. Use gradual bends.
 
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Old 05-18-05, 11:20 AM
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I think it is a personal preference issue. Running the wires past and looping back could be a benefit if it became necessary to relocate a breaker within a panel at a later time. I personally think it looks better not to do it that way. A 90 degree bend is O.K. as long as the radius of the bend isn't too sharp. As a guideline, a bend about the radius of the screwdriver handle you are using is sufficient.
 
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Old 05-18-05, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by txdiyguy
A 90 degree bend is O.K. as long as the radius of the bend isn't too sharp.
That's what I should have said!
 
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Old 01-04-07, 11:56 AM
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Installation technique

The forming of loops on wires (ie. taking the wire past the circuit breaker then forming a loop with a gradual bend into the circuit breaker) is called a "drip loop", this is done to prevent any water or other fluids that may spill/drip onto the top of the panel enclosure from following the wiring down into the circuit breakers. With the drip loop correctly formed, the water/fluids will only follow the wiring to the bottom of the loop, then harmlessly drip off and exit through the bottom of the panel box. If the panel box is located in an area where it can be directly or indirectly exposed to excessive moisture or condinsation drip loops are a good idea. I hope this helps.
Jim
 
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