Adding a 220V outlet

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  #1  
Old 05-29-05, 11:56 AM
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Adding a 220V outlet

This is a pic of a soon to be 220V outlet:
220Voutlet

Would I be able to pigtail off of this one to put another outlet further down the wall (this is in a garage).

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 05-29-05, 12:44 PM
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Before anything is said.......what was the PURPOSE of this 220V outlet and what was the intent for it...hmmm..redundant question but needs an answer.

Most people do not install a 220V outlet without it's usual dedicated use or for a reason......explain why this one was run and what it was intended for.
 
  #3  
Old 05-29-05, 12:55 PM
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Sorry for the lack of information... I intend to use 220 for a welder, and also an automobile lift. I figure I can use the same circuit, as I will never be using both at the same time.
 
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Old 05-29-05, 01:25 PM
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There is nothing in the code that prohibits multiple outlets on a 240-volt circuit. However, 240-volt circuits are usually specifically designed for one particular purpose. They are not general purpose as are most 120-volt circuits. So the only way you can do this is if the electrical specifications of the circuit matches exactly (neither too high nor too low) the electrical requirements of what you plan to connect to it.

Looks like that is 12-gauge wire, which implies that this is a 20-amp circuit. Only pretty small welders can work on that size circuit. I don't know about your auto lift.
 
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Old 05-29-05, 01:43 PM
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I would be using a small welder that should work with 20A. The lifts are usually 2-4hp motors, which I assume would be OK with a 20A circuit?
 
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Old 05-29-05, 04:29 PM
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What model welder? I like John would run special circuits for each machine. I would run number 10 for the welding machine also, for a couple of reasons. 1. a larger machine could be used if the need arised, and secondly most machines of that class come with a 6-50-P plug so they can be used on common welder circuits. The outlet for them, 6-50-R is listed for use with number 10 thru 4 wire, the 12 is too small. This outlet would be different than one for a hoist, you have the wall open, now is the time. In a shop I would be tempted to leave a way to add surface piping in the future as new needs come up. It is tough to pre-plan for evey need in a garage. I have a lot of single outlet circuits and I keep the lights on their own, no sharing with general use outlets.
 
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Old 05-30-05, 03:53 AM
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I was looking at a Lincoln sp175plus for a welder.
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-05, 01:43 PM
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The manual states.
NEMA TYPE 6-50P Plug.
8 ga wire, copper.
40 amp fuse.
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-05, 03:30 PM
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Yes, that machine is considered best in its class. Very good unit, I have one. I have several Lincoln units and someone was sniffing the circuit board varnish when they wrote that one up. Yup, has a 6-50-P on the cord. I have a 255A feeder and they allow 10 wire with a 50, go figure, twice the machine and they allow smaller wire and a bigger breaker. The machine pulls 20A wide open (the 175), I would install a 6-50-R recept and run it on a number 10 wire and a 30A breaker. You would never trip a 20 with this machine either but the 10/30 is a good combo.
 
  #10  
Old 06-01-05, 08:57 AM
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Thanks for the advice...I'll have to make sure it will be up to snuff.
 
  #11  
Old 06-01-05, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by sberry27
I would install a 6-50-R recept and run it on a number 10 wire and a 30A breaker.

If I understand table 210.21(B)(3) correctly, a 50A receptical can only be fed by a 40A or 50A circuit.
 
  #12  
Old 06-05-05, 01:08 PM
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Back up a paragraph I think, there is an exception for welding machines. You could use any wire exceot the 50A recept is listed for use for 10 thru number 4 wire. The machine he has would run on 12 but the recept isnt listed for it. Lincoln is really goofy when they came to listing the electric specs for this particular unit, I am suprised to see it several years later still the same. Hobart and Miller have their 175 class machines listed differently and changed them a couple times along the way. Their other machines are spec'ed pretty good and fairly easy to understand, with the 175's they have dropped the ball in the manuals especially considering that these machines are geared to the homeowner market, I would have thought that they would have paid extra special attn to detail in the manuals. The Hobart lists minimum of 14 wire with min of 12 ground wire and a max 30A breaker on one of them. Now if that isnt about enough to confuse Joe Public. People think they cant run them on 50's all kinds of things, that breaker is the max when using the 14 wire, go up a size and you could use a 50 The machine has a number 12 cord on it so it can be used on common welder circuits, thats why the 50A plug. To make thigs simple for this class of machine, 10 wire and 30A breaker, its good to go even with long runs as that machine in normal use pulls about 15-16A or so. Its max draw is something like 22 but the avg homeowner wont be able to figure out how to adjust it to squeeze that out of it.
 
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