Canadian code question

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  #1  
Old 05-31-05, 04:14 PM
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Canadian code question

I know it is code down south to run a 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp circuit as long as there is more than one outlet, what about Canada? I can not seem to find a true 20 amp receptical and want to put one in for the lights on my large fish tank.

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Ted
 
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  #2  
Old 05-31-05, 05:33 PM
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It is my understanding that the CEC does NOT allow 15 amp receptacles on a 20 amp circuit in any way shape or form.
 
  #3  
Old 05-31-05, 05:33 PM
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T-Slot 5-20RA

You should be able to find a 20 amp receptacle in any hardware store. It's called a t-slot (5-20RA). Looks like a "normal" 15 amp receptacle, but with the live slot looking like a "T".

In Canada you are not allowed to have 15 amp receptacles on a 20 amp (12/2 wire) circuit. Donít know why, since all 15 amp receptacles are rated for 20 amp pass-through.
 
  #4  
Old 05-31-05, 06:20 PM
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Ok thanks ... I think I figured this out myself anyways They are fairly hard to find and pretty expensive is why I asked .... oh well I only need 5 total ...

Ted
 
  #5  
Old 05-31-05, 06:29 PM
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Have to looked in Home Depot?

Are you sure you are looking at the right type? Receptacles (and switches, etc) are available in three types, residential (cheap, avoid), commercial (good), and industrial (very expensive).

In any price point, the 20 amp receptacles are not much more than their 15 amp brothers.
 
  #6  
Old 05-31-05, 06:36 PM
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impeyr,

Perhaps I am not looking in the right place, but I have yet to see residential grade 20 amp receptacles. I have seen them in 15 amp, but in 20 amp I only see commercial and industrial grade.

Now understand I'm not looking for them to buy them, I just haven;t seen them to avoid them.
 
  #7  
Old 05-31-05, 06:36 PM
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I live in a smaller town and no Home Depot but last time I went to one I could not find any. I use the cooper decor stuff ... I found some at my Hardware store today (home hardware) and they were 3 bux each for a non decor type and I saw only one decor type with no price .. considering I get 10 15 amp decor type for about 10 dollars I considered 3 each a lot ....


Ted
 
  #8  
Old 05-31-05, 07:04 PM
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In Canada the receptacle must match the circuit. 15 amo on 15 amp and 20 amp on 20 amp. 20 amp should not be that hard to find. They are required for kitchen counter receptacles.
 
  #9  
Old 05-31-05, 09:04 PM
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20 am for kitchen counter recpts? I just got Electrical Code Simplified Alberta edition and it seemed the prefered way is using 14-3 to create a split recept and every other recp on a different circuit with a max of two on each. It did say 20 was allowed but it almost seemed to advise against it.

Ted
 
  #10  
Old 06-01-05, 08:58 AM
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15 amp kitchen split circuits (wired with 14/3) are still perfectly legal in new construction. 20 amp circuits (wired with 12/2) are also allowed. The circuit is only allowed to serve two kitchen counter receptacles, and the receptacles can not be adjacent. No other outlet is allowed on the same curcuit (not even lights). So you need a least two circuits for even a small kitchen. BTW, you are also allowed to install 20 amp kitchen split circuits (wired with 12/3), but see below for why this may not a good idea.

The main reason to go with the newer 20 amp circuits (besides extra power, less breakers, simplified wiring, etc) is the new requirement for a Ground Fault Interrupter receptacle within one metre of the sink. Although it is possible to install a double poled GFI breaker on a split circuit, the breakers are very, very expensive. The 20 amp GFI receptacle is fairly cheap.

I should point out all the information above is correct in Ontario, you need to check for Alberta. BTW what edition of the Electrical Code Simplified (Alberta) do you have? Is it the latest? (8th Edition) (http://www.psknight.com/alberta_book_1.htm)
 

Last edited by impeyr; 06-01-05 at 11:29 AM.
  #11  
Old 06-01-05, 09:35 AM
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I was actually going to go the split recepticle ether 15 or 20 amp. Unless I run a 20 for each outlet it gives me more power than a 20 running 2 non-split recepticles.

Ok now what is CFI?

Hehe this is not going to be a project until next winter time anyways .... I acutally bought the book for wiring up my basement for 2 Bedrooms / 1 office / sewing room / 1 bathroom / laundry/furnace/fish room ... large 235 gallon fish tank a HT and wetbar. Most of the rough rooms were in place but since I am taking down the ugly wood paneling and putting up sheetrock I can actually do things right and to code ....

I am actually also moving my panel downstairs. I bought a large Square D 100 amp panel with breakers and the main ... ran 8/3 down off a 40 amp breaker and moved all I could. In the next month or two I will get a 3/3 from the meter (just above this panel, I actually moved the panel right below the old one just downstairs rather than in my back entryway) reverse the 8/3 so the above panel is a subpanel and move the range downstairs. Then eventually move everything down stairs and use the old panel in the garage.

Old panel had 16 spaces ... new panel has 32 .... so even with all I plan on doing I will have lots of room even if I need to eventually buy a few tandems


Yes the book is the latest edition I just bought it yesterday and checked that.

Thanks

Ted
 
  #12  
Old 06-01-05, 11:28 AM
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Sorry

I meant GFI - Ground Fault Interrupter.
 
  #13  
Old 06-01-05, 11:30 AM
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No problem I figured as much ..... Yeah I can see how three double pole GFI's could get expensive and I suppose one can't split a GFI ... I never looked so really don't know ...
Edit .. duh ... GFI don't work on 12/3 ....

Thanks

Ted
 
  #14  
Old 06-02-05, 07:14 AM
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If you truly need 20A for the fish tank, you will need to upgrade the conductors in the whole circuit to 12AWG and all other receptacles on the circuit must be upgraded to 20A. It would probably be easier to just run a new 20A circuit. Don't forget that in Canada, light fixtures cannot be ona 20A circuit.

Steve
 
  #15  
Old 06-02-05, 08:04 AM
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Yup it is a brand new circuit just for the plug in tank lights using 12 gauge wire ....

Ted
 
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