Shared Neutral Kitchen Circuits

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  #1  
Old 06-03-05, 06:36 AM
C
ceflyer
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Shared Neutral Kitchen Circuits

Good Morning!

I have a situation in a kitchen remodel in which I'm planning on meeting the requirements for my two 120V - 20A small appliance countertop circuits by utilizing one 12/3 wiring run. My initial understanding of this was that I should utilize two 20A single pole breakers on separate bus bars, then alternate the use of my red and black "hots" at every other receptacle. Is this correct? Should I be using a 20A double pole breaker instead? Will I be able to get GFCI monitoring ability from my receptacles with the shared nuetral? If so, are the connections any different than a 12/2 circuit? Any thoughts on this is greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-03-05, 06:48 AM
R
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To do what you propose, you would need to make each and every receptacle a GFCI receptacle, and make all connections on the line side of the GFCI.

Your other alternative is to use a 240 volt GFCI circuit breaker. These are a bit pricey, but might be cheaper than the number of GFCI receptacles you need.
 
  #3  
Old 06-03-05, 06:48 AM
J
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Using 12/3 and a multiwire circuit would indeed fulfill the U.S. requirements for two small appliance circuits. However, multiwire circuits and GFCI make uneasy bedfellows. Doing it this way would require you to either: (1) Use a GFCI receptacle in every outlet (i.e., no downstream protection available), or (2) use an expensive double-pole GFCI breaker.

So it's up to you. Two runs of 12/2 would be easier and cheaper, but you can use the 12/3 and one of the two options above if you want.
 
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Old 06-03-05, 11:27 AM
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ceflyer
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Thank you both, for the speedy and informative replies. I was planning on installing all GFCI receptacles individually protected anyway, so this should work out fine. The two single pole breakers should go on separate legs, right?
 
  #5  
Old 06-03-05, 11:33 AM
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I would recommend using a double pole breaker. This will guarantee that each side of the shared neutral circuit is on opposite phases (absolutely required) and that both sides are de-energized when the breaker is shut off or trips (highly recommended).
 
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