what is cheaper? oil heat or electric baseboard?

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  #1  
Old 06-14-05, 05:47 PM
oil_or_electric
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what is cheaper? oil heat or electric baseboard?

I thought electric is cheaper to have (overall cost monthly). but im not sure. ???



for example; we have a 275 gal oil tank. to fill it at $2.14/gal, that is about $588.
plus, the yearly contract we pay for for cleaning and future breakdowns. that is $310/year. we usually get two partial refills of the tank during the winter, at around $300/each time.


with electric baseboard heat, we could can the cleaning hassles, and the contract expenses. baseboard heat is virtually maintenance free.

Im just wondering, since we have a large area to heat, could the electric bills be WORSE than the oil?? :/
 
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Old 06-14-05, 05:56 PM
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I believe the electric would be much worse. Here in NH, we are allowed to pre-pay during the summer months for the upcoming heating season. For instance if your oil is 2.14 per gl. .... Here we would be able to pre-pay for 500 gallons at a price of about 1.49 a gallon. The experts on here will provide you with a link that lets you calculate the amount of BTU'S of the different energy sources. Oil just about always comes the cheapest 99% of the time. Hope this helps. You didn't mention your hot water source , whether it is part of your oil system of and stand alone electric tank. I do respect your question though, because as I watch news daily, the oil futures are really going thru the roof. But still cheaper than electric.
 
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Old 06-14-05, 05:58 PM
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Take and go to http://www.warmair.net you can compare the fuel cost there and it will tell you what to use that way.In MO here we havent sold an oil furnace ill bet in over 20 years . Its all electric heat pumps.So if electric is best for you there for sure go a heat pump. You get more heat for your money

ED
 
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Old 06-14-05, 06:29 PM
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Ed, with all due respect, you are in Florida.

Here in the Northeast it's mostly oil fired boilers. There are many new high efficiency units.




Originally Posted by oil_or_electric
could the electric bills be WORSE than the oil?? :/
Short answer: Hell yes!
 
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Old 06-15-05, 07:08 AM
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Speedy, I also assumed he was in the northeast . Especially the price of the oil, and the number of refills per heating season. Maybe he will post back and give a location. Have a great day.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 03:11 PM
oil_or_electric
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northeast

sorry, Im in the northeast.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 03:38 PM
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I have baseboard heat. My electric bill skyrockets during the winter. Bill is running about 40 bucks per month now and climbs to 130 - 140 bucks per month during winter ( we've had some unseasonably mild winters the last few years). I use a wood stove to take some of the bite off the electric bill.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 03:46 PM
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The only advantage to electric is you can turn down the stats in rooms you don't use. You only heat the rooms needed. Still don't think is cheaper.
Have you considered switching to natural gas or propane.
 
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Old 06-15-05, 04:09 PM
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Speedy Petey

Go to that warmair.net I gave you That will tell you what is the best way to go cost wise for fuel. Forget Fl here, Like I said my company is up in Missouri and all we sell now and install are heatpumps. But oil I do know it. Yes I sold it and serviced all kind of oil burners furnace and boilers wet or dry leg ones .Just about any old oil burner if you know what you are doing you can get it up to a AFUE about 75% to 80%. The last they are doing with oil is kick up the pump and cut the nozzle down

But if its the cost of fuel thats got you .Take and put in a DX GeoThermal heat pump and be done with . That way you will have a very small electric bill all year

ED
 
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Old 06-15-05, 04:12 PM
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Ed, sorry about that. I truly thought you meant: "In M(my) O(opinion)".
Darn forum speak got me all confused.
 
  #11  
Old 06-15-05, 04:46 PM
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The cost of heating with different fuels depends upon how you use them.

If you compare direct resistance electrical heating (the simplest kind) to fuel combustion heating, you will find that the electric costs between 3 and 5x the fuel. Electricity is a very expensive form of energy. Most electric baseboard heating is simple resistance heating that chews up lots of watts.

But electricity is also higher grade; you can do stuff with it that you can't do with fuel, or cannot do nearly as efficiently with fuel. For example, an electric motor will convert electrical energy into mechanical energy with perhaps 80-80% efficiency, even more for larger motors. But a fuel engine will only work at perhaps 15-30% efficiency. If you need mechanical output, then the cost of electricity is often cheaper (per unit output) than burning fuel, at least in stationary applications.

One of the things that you can do with electricity is run a 'heat pump'. This is a device which carries the heat present at a lower temperature, and boosts it up to a higher temperature. Think air-conditioner running backwards; the outdoors gets a bit cooler and your house gets a bit warmer. Because the heat that you get from a heat pump is mostly that collected from the outside world, the total _electric_ power input is lower than the thermal power output.

For many applications, the efficiency boost from a heat pump can make electric heat pump heating cost less than fuel burning. The downside is much larger initial investment.

-Jon
 
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Old 06-16-05, 04:35 AM
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Good luck on the fuel prices this winter, i work for a state entity (don't pay fuel taxes) and our locked price per gal this year is $1.58. So don't expect all too nice prepays. I have an oil burner and last year i got a pellet stove. The pellet stoves are nice...
 
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Old 06-16-05, 03:39 PM
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man....you all make me glad I am virginia.....We have a heatpump that does well for us...However, in the winter we have in our basement gas logs that run on propane and we use that to suppliment the heating since the heat rises our house stays toasty without the heatpump coming on...

But yes.......Propane prices have gone out of this world so I told the wire this year...think Blankets...Lots of Blankets
 
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Old 06-17-05, 12:11 PM
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One other thing: No type of heat is cost effective if it isn't staying in the house. A couple hundred dollars in insulation and calking might save their cost in the first year and even make the house feel warmer at a lower temp. setting.

Since we're on the electrical forum, I might also add that, depending on how large your house is and what type of electrical service you have, changing to electric heat could be a major ordeal.

Doug M.
 
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