Rough-in inspection question

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Old 06-16-05, 07:46 PM
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Rough-in inspection question

My Rough-in inspection is scheduled for Friday Afternoon on my detached garage wiring project. Right now, all the circuits come into the sub-panel along with the feeder, but no wires are hooked up to breakers. Do you typically leave the wires disconnected in the subpanel for a rough-in inspection or should I install the breakers?

I tried calling the inspector today and he was out of the office all day.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 06-16-05, 08:22 PM
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Around here, not only do we not put in breakers, we remove the "guts" of the panel and store for safekeeping. We leave the sheath on NM cable to protect it during the drywall hang and finish process. Some guys label each circuit by writing on the NM sheath. This wouldn't be possible if you strip off the sheath. Basically, a "rough" includes only the things you have to have in before drywall is installed. The inspectors do like to see the sheath removed in boxes to see if you've made up the grounds properly (with green wire nuts) or, in the case of a metal box, to make sure you have connected the ground wire to the box with a green screw.
 
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Old 06-17-05, 12:56 PM
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hmmm....We usually make up the panels neutrals and grounds and strip all the other wires down and curl them around the sides of the panel. That way when it comes to trim out all we have to do is put in the breakers and label the panel.

IN many cases we also do this and out in a breaker feeding the GFCI recept. we put below the panel....we do this in any room we put the panel in...easier to have the reset point known to be at the panel...saves confussion when the home owner trips a breaker outside and wants to know where it is reset....but doing this allows us to also get early service and service inspection at the rough in stage...
 
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Old 06-17-05, 08:32 PM
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"but doing this allows us to also get early service and service inspection at the rough in stage..."

Are you (ElectricalMan) saying that you can get a meter set at this stage?
 
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Old 06-18-05, 05:05 AM
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Oh yes...we do it all the time.


What we are allowed to do is make up all the neutrals and grounds and then neartly wrap the black wires around in the panel and we make up (1) breaker which goes to the GFCI recept. below the panel....only to the Line side of the GFCI so it is the only one that works......then upon the rough in we also request the service inspection also ( we make up everything and set the meter cab and in our area we also make up the meter cab )

What this does is allow the power UTL company to do their thing and feed the house........the inspector allows us to get early service because we put the panel cover on and only 1 breaker in the panel leading to the GFCI recept.

Once we finish the rough in we do this...not always but in homes we know they will be doing floor sanding and so on we do this and when we request the rough in inspection we also request early service inspection ( service panel inspection ) too allow early service.

It is a little more tricky when trimming out the panel but again been doing it for nearly 17 years so we are a bit seasoned at it...lol....
 
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Old 06-18-05, 06:18 AM
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Just a follow up on my original post, I live in Webster Groves, MO and the inspector came out on Friday for the rough-in inspection. I left the sub-panel with the feeders and circuits (I used armored cable so all circuits were THWN) all unwired, but labeled.

Overall, he was very pleased with the installation, especially for a do-it-yourselfer. I didn't even see him since he showed up a bit early. I left the garage unlocked so he took a look over while I was on my way home from work and he gave me a call afterwords to tell me that the rough-in passed.

Looking back, this project was not too hard since I had a good gameplan going into it. (Rreplacing my galvanized water pipes with copper was more difficult.) Digging the 31" deep trench 35 feet long was definately the hardest and most time consuming part. I run 5 days a week and lift weights 3 days a week and consider myself in excellent shape and that trench was still a major pain in the a$$. I dug it that deep because I'm putting in some draining lines today once I start backfilling it and I need to maintain a slope over a good distance and maintain distance between the Electrical PVC run.

Thanks again for all the help.
 
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Old 06-18-05, 07:30 PM
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wubears71,

Glad you passed. Just on a side note...why did you run AC in your house? why not NM-Cable or better known as Romax?

Just figured I would ask because to be honest with you as an electrician...you give me the choice and NM Cable all the way for me

Just was not sure if in your area they have a local code in regards to the AC cable being used....

Anyway...we are here when ever you need us....Electricians with no place to go.....thehehehe
 
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Old 06-18-05, 08:27 PM
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Romex is acceptable but AC is preferred in unfinished garages. In our area, most garages are detached and unfinished and from what others have told me, the inspector is less nit-picky with AC.

Since this garage will never be finished and I keep a lot of sharp objects in the garage (shovels, rakes, axe, hoe, etc), I didn't want to take the chance of setting something against the wall and cutting the romex. Plus, AC looks cooler.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-19-05, 06:56 AM
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wubears71,

I hear ya brother..... AC does look cool.....but I guess I have a story to tell...and why I frown on AC when I dont need to use it...lol...

I took on a job that we had to run 9,000' of AC total...and we were under the gun so I did most of it myself and worked 7 days a week to get the job done for a commercial job and large law publishing firm...anyway I got my FILL of that AC stuff...lol....loved the GREY grease it left on my clothing and all the time it took me to install the rubber grommets in the metal studs we pulled it through...or should I say "I" pulled it through...lol...

Anyway...I am sure the inspector would have been fine with NM cable but again at the end of the day it is what YOU want and you are clearly allowed to run the AC if you wish......Glad your inspection went well.....

Sure I have done jobs with AC since the HEADACHE job but it always reminds me of the JOB from H*ll...lol...
 
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