New kitchen wiring

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  #1  
Old 07-12-05, 09:29 AM
Spyder Dryver
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New kitchen wiring

Hello to all. I have gutted my 12 x 9 kitchen as part of my remodeling project, and I now need to wire it before the drywall and cabinets are installed. I am familiar with wiring, as I have rewired many of the old circuits according to the 2002 NEC a couple of years ago. I just would like to verify my kitchen plan with the 2005 NEC and ask a couple of questions.

Electric range - dedicated 50 amp circuit, 6/3 cable from panel to new 50 amp receptacle. How far above the floor should the receptacle be placed? Is a standard one-gang plastic box good enough for this receptacle? I have never done any receptacles other than the 120 volt 15 amp ones, I just want to make sure I don't miss anything.

Microwave (above the range) - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle.

Refrigerator - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle.
Again, how far above the floor should the receptacle be placed?

Dishwasher - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel directly to dishwasher (it was hardwired before, and I did not purchase a new dishwasher).

Garbage disposal - dedicated 15 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to switch. 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle (I will have to verify my new disposal - I don't know if it is hard-wired or has a plug). I am going to reuse the 15 amp breaker that the old disposal was on. The other appliances will be using new breakers. If I should replace the breaker with a 20 amp one, I will do so.

Over the counter - 2 20 amp circuits providing power to the receptacles. One receptacle within 24 inches of each end of the counter, and other receptacles spaced within 48 inches of each other. I anticipate that I will need about 4 GCFI protected receptacles based on my counter space. How far above the counter should these receptacles be placed?

Over the sink lighting - I will extend the current first floor 20 amp lighting circuit to a switch with 12/2. The ceiling fan/light in the kitchen has already been wired with 12/3 (for separate switches for the fan and the light).

I also have a bar separating the kitchen and the dining room. The dining room and the bar are currently served by a 20 amp circuit. On this circuit are 3 single gang receptacles serving the dining room, a dual gang receptacle on the wall perpendicular to the bar, and a single gang receptacle on the kitchen side of the bar wall. Are there any other considerations for this circuit based on my kitchen plan?

Thanks in advance for any feedback that you may offer.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-12-05, 12:54 PM
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Unless I overlooked something I see all the dedicated circuits required.

How far above the floor should the receptacle be placed? Is a standard one-gang plastic box good enough for this receptacle? I have never done any receptacles other than the 120 volt 15 amp ones, I just want to make sure I don't miss anything.
Since this is a cord and plug appliance and this serves as your disconnecting means. I think its good thought to place them high enough so they dont show but easy enough to reach around and unplug them without having to pull the entire range out away from the wall. If you are going to locate the receptacle on the wall you will want a double gang box and flush mount 4 wire receptacle like this
http://www.sjgreatdeals.com/ge41813.html


Microwave (above the range) - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle
.
Nothing to do here IMO

Refrigerator - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle.Again, how far above the floor should the receptacle be placed?
Good idea IMO. Some will add one more circuit to the kitchen for general wall receptacles and tie the refrigerator to that circuit. No requirement on the placement of the receptacle. I like 36 to 42 inches off the floor.


Dishwasher - dedicated 20 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel directly to dishwasher (it was hardwired before, and I did not purchase a new dishwasher).
I cant add any thing

Garbage disposal - dedicated 15 amp circuit, 12/2 cable from panel to switch. 12/2 cable from panel to receptacle (I will have to verify my new disposal - I don't know if it is hard-wired or has a plug). I am going to reuse the 15 amp breaker that the old disposal was on. The other appliances will be using new breakers. If I should replace the breaker with a 20 amp one, I will do so
.
Nothing to add just keep in mind your switch placement.

Over the counter - 2 20 amp circuits providing power to the receptacles. One receptacle within 24 inches of each end of the counter, and other receptacles spaced within 48 inches of each other. I anticipate that I will need about 4 GCFI protected receptacles based on my counter space. How far above the counter should these receptacles be placed?
You will only need 2 gfci's first in the circuit and protect the other receptacles down stream off the load terminals of those single gfci's. Or 2 gfci breakers at the main panel. I prefer the gfci receptacles so you dont have to run to the main panel to reset if one trips. Be aware of receptacle placement so that it is above the countertop, most are 10" to 12" above. Consider horizontal placement for nice clean appearance. If you put a horizontal nailer between studs along the counter top with the bottom of the nailer at about 42" this will put you just above the back splash. This may vary of course. This way you will not be restricted to anchoring the receptacle boxes to the studs but can use the nailer to anchor the boxes for lateral placement.




Over the sink lighting - I will extend the current first floor 20 amp lighting circuit to a switch with 12/2. The ceiling fan/light in the kitchen has already been wired with 12/3 (for separate switches for the fan and the light).
Only comment I have is when you extend circuits dont mix wire sizes but doesnt look like you are doing that.



I also have a bar separating the kitchen and the dining room. The dining room and the bar are currently served by a 20 amp circuit. On this circuit are 3 single gang receptacles serving the dining room, a dual gang receptacle on the wall perpendicular to the bar, and a single gang receptacle on the kitchen side of the bar wall. Are there any other considerations for this circuit based on my kitchen plan?
On days like Christmas and Thanksgiving its hard telling what the girls will plug into dining room receptacles. Consider adding another 20 amp circuit. A multiwire circuit is a good way to do that and you sound like you will understand how to do that if you ask the forum. This would require removing the existing circuit or using it for something else. A multi wire will give you 2 20 amp circuits with only one run of wire. No other circuits can share these receptacles, same as the kitchen requiremnts.


Consider a receptacle under the sink or stub in a box and cable in the event you ever want instant hot water. (Do not tie to countertop receptacles)

Avoid placing any receptacles below the countertop (exterior) these are dangerous. Children pull on the cords plugged into them and hot grease and kids dont go well together.
 

Last edited by Roger; 07-12-05 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 07-12-05, 09:42 PM
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One thing to think about is undercabinet lighting. Now would be a good time to install any switches you might want or need. They cannot be tied into the kitchen circuits.
Just a thought
 
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Old 07-13-05, 07:51 AM
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They cannot be tied into the kitchen circuits
They cannot be tied into the kitchen receptacle circuits.
 
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Old 07-13-05, 09:33 AM
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For the range-receptacle outlet-box use a "deep" 4-11/16" metal O-B with a 1/2" deep "rough-cover".You will need the cubic-inch area of this box because of the condutor-size and the size of the receptacle.

You mention a 12/2 "home-run" for the fridge. Consider a 14/3 2-circuit H-R, with one of the two circuits as a 15-amp seperate-circuit for the fridge alone.This can be percieved, Code-wise, as a Branch-Circuit for a single motor-compressor.The other 15-amp circuit could be for the D-W alone, and is essentialy a single-motor circuit.

The one advantage of 12/2 H-R's for the kitchen-receptacles is that such circuits can be protected by a GFI circuit-breaker, an arrangement which is better that GFI receptacles. I believe the benefits of GFI C-B protection justifies the expence. Shoiuld you prefer GFI receptacles, you can simplify the wiring with 12/3, 2-circuit Branch-Circuits.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Old 07-13-05, 10:01 AM
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Pattbaa your right I should have mentioned this detail. It is very important to have this size o-b to make the wiring of the range receptacle easier and compliant. On the same note I have seen some people really struggle getting the wires stripped the right length the first time they try to wire up the receptacle when using cable. They have a tendency to strip off too much of the jacket and end up with the jacket not catching the clamp.
 
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Old 07-14-05, 11:00 AM
ceflyer
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[QUOTE=Spyder Dryver]
Electric range - dedicated 50 amp circuit, 6/3 cable from panel to new 50 amp receptacle. How far above the floor should the receptacle be placed? [QUOTE]

Having just been through a similar project, I have one piece of advice to add to the good tips already offered. Most ranges have an opening in back that usually comes about 8-9 inches off the floor to make room for the excess cording. If you hope to have a flush-mount installation, just make sure your box is placed within this region so the unit can sit right against the wall.
 
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Old 07-14-05, 04:16 PM
Spyder Dryver
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Thanks for all the help. I assume that the bigger size outlet box for the range receptacle could be located around the same boxes at the big box stores? Yesterday, someone at hd tried to sell me a surface mount receptacle that looked more like a transformer than a receptacle (pardon my terminology), but I declined until I could verify the proper box.

I have a followup question about drilling through joists to run the cable, however. I was under the impression that you should drill through the vertical center of a joist - is that correct? Some of the existing joist holes were not exactly center. Since I am going to be sistering these joists to produce a stiffer floor, I want to drill the joists in the appropriate location.
 
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Old 07-14-05, 07:28 PM
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You are correct about the vertical placement for drilled holes in the joist. The least amount of damage is done by drilling the hole in the neutral plane of the joist.

There should be no problem with using the surface mount receptacle for the range.
 
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Old 07-15-05, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Spyder Dryver
I was under the impression that you should drill through the vertical center of a joist - is that correct?
Yes, you should drill through the middle third of the joists. If possible, try to drill through roughly the middle horizontally as well. In other words, not near the beam or the basement wall.
 
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Old 07-21-05, 12:28 PM
Spyder Dryver
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Rough-in passed

Thanks for the help. The rough-in inspection passed. Now comes the hard part - drywall
 
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Old 07-21-05, 02:14 PM
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The least structural impact is a hole not too close (a couple of feet) to either supported end, but also out of the middle third of the span as well. But if the hole is not too big, and if it is vertically centered, and if the joist was correctly sized in the first place, and if you don't have a lot of holes, you can use the middle third of the span too.
 
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