Install 3-prong electric range outlet

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  #1  
Old 07-13-05, 09:50 PM
clewis120
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Question Install 3-prong electric range outlet

I read an old (2002) post saying that if an existing 3-wire ran to the range or dryer, I must install only a 3-wire outlet and 3-wire cord to my new range, and not to use a 4-wire unless I ran all new wiring. Does this still apply?

My old range had a direct connection to the recepticle box which I could not unplug when the range caught fire. After we put the fire out, I unhooked the old cord from its box at the wall and hauled both it and the range outside. I installed a new box at the site, but after reading your information, wanted to see if I did it correctly before I plug in the new range tomorrow.

I popped the hole out of the 3-prong box (brand new from Lowe's--I'm ***uming the box is okay) and attached the box to the side of the stud exactly where the old square box had been. I ran the wires, red, black, & white, to the screws inside the box. I attached the white wire to the center screw, then the red & black wires to the other two screws (does it matter which goes to which pole?) I tightened them down at the poles (at the screws--sorry, I'm not sure of the proper terminology), but did not push them through all the way until they touched the input for the actual plug. Is there a connection built into the box so that the prongs on the plug do not have to actually touch the hot wires?

I then recovered the outlet with its black plastic cover. After turning the electricity back on, nothing sparked, so apparently I haven't done anything too dangerous at this point. However, the new stove arrives tomorrow morning and I would like your guidance as to whether or not I should plug it in. Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 07-13-05, 10:03 PM
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I read an old (2002) post saying that if an existing 3-wire ran to the range or dryer, I must install only a 3-wire outlet and 3-wire cord to my new range, and not to use a 4-wire unless I ran all new wiring. Does this still apply?
Yes, it still applies (unless you have and insulated neutral plus grounding by virtue of metallic conduit).
does it matter which goes to which pole?
No.
Is there a connection built into the box so that the prongs on the plug do not have to actually touch the hot wires?
Not quite sure what you mean, but I think the answer is yes. Something has to provide a continuous metallic connection.
 
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Old 07-13-05, 10:10 PM
clewis120
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Question Electric Range Outlet

By the way, is there any way to attach a surge protector to this outlet? We get a lot of weather issues and have numerous power surges, one of which caused us to lose three surge protectors and a dishwasher a few years ago. The new dishwasher is on a standard surge protector which I mounted on the wall.

Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 07-13-05, 10:20 PM
clewis120
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Install electric range outlet

Thank you for your quick response. That definitely helped a lot. The 3-prong wiring appears to be standard insulated red, white, & black--fairly wide. As for the metal conduit, the thing attached to the box at the wall that actually ran to the stove did look something like that. We couldn't unplug it, so I removed it from the wall, which left us staring at raw red, white, and black wires. There were some blue plastic covers for each of the wires to attach them to the wires in the metal conduit, but when I attached the wires to the new box, there no longer seems to be any need for the blue covers.

I'll let you know how it goes--especially the part about which (black or red) wire goes to which post. Your decicive "no" that there is no difference did make me feel better. I was concerned that it might work like the negative & positive terminals on a car battery. I have never replaced a plug of this magnitude before--only little wall sockets. Thanks!
 
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Old 07-14-05, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by clewis120
By the way, is there any way to attach a surge protector to this outlet? We get a lot of weather issues and have numerous power surges, one of which caused us to lose three surge protectors and a dishwasher a few years ago. The new dishwasher is on a standard surge protector which I mounted on the wall.

Thanks for your help!
I doubt a surge protector is made for an old 3-wire range receptical (or for the new 4-wire for that matter). Since you have surge issues, you might want to check into having a "whole house" surge suppressor installed at the main breaker box (have an electrician do this for you unless you know what you are doing inside a breaker box). Siemens makes one for their panels that takes the place of two standard 20A breakers (cost is about $35 for the part). I imagine other manufacturers may have similar products. Note that this would not eliminate the need for surge protection for electronics, but would provide a good "first line of defense". I've been planning on installing one at my house once I get a "round tuit".
 
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