adding a kiln


  #1  
Old 07-15-05, 05:32 AM
momtj
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adding a kiln

We just bought a kiln and want to run it in the garage. Our fuse box is small and full. I'd like split off from the dryer in the basement (it is within 10 feet) and put in some kind of switch that would direct the power either to the kiln or the dryer so they can't be used at the same time. Is this possible? Is it okay to do? We are in Ohio.
 
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Old 07-15-05, 08:25 AM
I
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What are the electrical requirements of the kiln? It should be listed in the instructions or stamped somewhere on the device, probably near the electrical hookup.
 
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Old 07-15-05, 12:32 PM
momtj
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Specs

The kiln is 230 Volt 22 Amp and 5200 watts approx.
 
  #4  
Old 07-15-05, 12:54 PM
I
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The best option is to run a new line for the kiln. Type NM (romex) 10/2 with ground cable is what you need. My recommendation is to run the new line for the kiln back to the panel box. That way when you or a future homeowner upgrades this old fused service, the kiln can be installed properly on its own breaker. Think about getting that old fuse box replaced too. Not only are breakers much safer than fuses, most home owners insurance companies will not insure houses with fuses or will charge a hefty premium to do so. It will be an issue at re-sale. Moreover, you probably only have a 60A serivce, which is very undersized for the average home. You already have nearly 60A consumed with just the dryer and the kiln.

If you used pigtails, you could connect the kiln to the same fuse block as the dryer, thus protecting both at 30A. You would have to pay attention to not use both at the same time. You could remember to unplug the dryer when the kiln is on for example.

I would not recommend that you use the existing dryer cable. It is possible, and it would work. But, just because it works doesn't mean it's safe. Based on the age of your electrical service, your old dryer cable probably is only 3 wires; any modification of this circuit would require you legally to upgrade to 4 wires. Your dryer cable may also be aluminum SER wire, which is tricky to make the connections properly and safely.
 
 

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