wiring from house to garage

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  #1  
Old 07-21-05, 06:48 PM
pinkfloyd
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wiring from house to garage

i want to run a wire from my house to my garage in the air.and have a fuse box in my garage.what type of wire should i use???????? what amp breaker should i start off with in my house that goes to the garage and then to another fuse box .can any one help me.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-22-05, 07:14 AM
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Originally Posted by pinkfloyd
i want to run a wire from my house to my garage in the air.and have a fuse box in my garage.what type of wire should i use???????? what amp breaker should i start off with in my house that goes to the garage and then to another fuse box .can any one help me.
Need more info. How far is it from the house to the garage? What's the planned electrical load going to be for the garage (power tools, lights, receptacles)? Do you have space available in the service panel for a 2-pole circuit breaker?
 
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Old 07-22-05, 06:35 PM
pinkfloyd
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it is about 40 feet from house.yes i want to put some lights and some recepticals maybe 4 recepticals and two lights .iwant to know if i can put a small box with some breakers in it.i know i can i was just asking how it should be done .what do you mean about a two pole circuit breaker.is it a breaker with 2 hots and two grounds like for making 220 ??????????? i see these now in my circuit box for my dryer and the main power shut off.these would be 220 110 and 110 together. is that what i need to feed my garage i think there is room for some more breakers in my box
 
  #4  
Old 07-22-05, 07:29 PM
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You are asking a great many questions and giving us quite a few "I think".

I respectfully submit that this is not the place to start. Do your reading first. Purchase two or three books on home wiring and read them. Electricity can kill, especially for someone who is not real familiar with it.

I do not recommend an overhead feed for your garage. I recommend that you dig a hole and run the wire underground. This is much easier to wire. Yes, it is harder to do (because of the trench), but it will be more durable.

But first, you have to decide how much power you want at the garage. 30 amps? 60 amps? 100 amps? We can't answer that for you. YOU have to answer that. We can make recommendations on amperage, but you have to tell us what you intend to run in the garage first.
 
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Old 07-22-05, 07:50 PM
pinkfloyd
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i will only will use a power saw here and there .or a vacume .the first plan was to wire underground with underground wire. it would be to much of a pain in the ass.thats why i ask what kind of wire to use. dont worry anything that gets hooked up to the circuit box i leave that to my fatheren law.he has his electrical training. ever thing else i do. by the way i wired that switch we talked about the other day it worked out fine i shut off breaker .i plugged something in to make sure it was off .and at receptiacal i got the power ran it to the switch hooked up both black wires to the switch wire nutted the to white wires together. grounded the green wire to the box and then grounded the wire going to the light to the nut on the switch .at the light black to black white to white green to box .and also electrical taped the reciptical were i got the power from and also electrical taped the wire nuts and the switch.
 
  #6  
Old 07-23-05, 07:24 PM
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This may sound petty but it is based on previous problems. The bare grounds; i.e. the Equipment Grounding Conductors (EGCs); should have been spliced together with each other and enough short jumper wires to go to the box if it is metal or to the switch/es if the box is plastic. Connecting one ground to the box and the other to the switch makes the continuity of the ground dependent on the switch and the US NEC specifically forbids this. Reopen the switch box and splice the two grounds together with a short jumper wire that you will connect to the box. Since the box is metallic you are not required to bond the switch yoke or strap to the Equipment Grounding Conductors.

250.148 Continuity and Attachment of Equipment Grounding Conductors to Boxes.
Where circuit conductors are spliced within a box, or terminated on equipment within or supported by a box, any separate equipment grounding conductors associated with those circuit conductors shall be spliced or joined within the box or to the box with devices suitable for the use. Connections depending solely on solder shall not be used. Splices shall be made in accordance with 110.14(B) except that insulation shall not be required. The arrangement of grounding connections shall be such that the disconnection or the removal of a receptacle, luminaire (fixture), or other device fed from the box will not interfere with or interrupt the grounding continuity.
I hope that helps.
--
Tom Horne
 
  #7  
Old 07-24-05, 12:30 PM
pinkfloyd
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you mean wire nut the 2 bare wires together and with another short wire ground only to the box . and dont wire anything to the switch?????????
 
  #8  
Old 07-24-05, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by pinkfloyd
you mean wire nut the 2 bare wires together and with another short wire ground only to the box . and don't wire anything to the switch?????????
If it is a metallic box then yes that is what I mean. You can add in a jumper for the switch if you want but it is not required. The mounting screws of a switch that is mounted to the ears of a metallic box have been tested and found to be adequate for grounding the strap or yoke of the switch and any metallic face plate attached thereto. What the code requires is that the continuity of the Equipment Grounding conductor not be dependent on the device that is mounted in the box. It must be possible to remove the device without interrupting the grounding continuity even momentarily.
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Tom Horne
 
  #9  
Old 07-24-05, 04:06 PM
pinkfloyd
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thank you but one more ? i started to wire the switch from a receptical which i grounded both bare wires to the receptical one coming from the circuit breaker and the other going to the switch is this ok.??????????? or should ground them both to the box ..........and not the receptical ??????? how do i know if the box is metallic .they are metal i know that
 
  #10  
Old 07-24-05, 05:22 PM
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The ground wires need to be pigtailed to the metal box and to the device. While there are self grounding devices, I don't trust them. Plus, you still MUST ground the box, even with a self grounding device.
 
  #11  
Old 07-25-05, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by pinkfloyd
thank you but one more ? i started to wire the switch from a receptical which i grounded both bare wires to the receptical one coming from the circuit breaker and the other going to the switch is this ok.??????????? or should ground them both to the box ..........and not the receptical ??????? how do i know if the box is metallic .they are metal i know that
Metal and metallic are two ways to say the same thing. In all cases if you would break the EGC by removing the device you have done it wrong. Splice your grounds together with enough jumpers to go to the box and each receptacle. In metal boxes bonding switches is optional.
--
Tom Horne
 
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