What is 12-2G NM-B Yellow Cable?

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  #1  
Old 07-27-05, 07:54 PM
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Question What is 12-2G NM-B Yellow Cable?

Crew...

I'm running new 20 amp circuits for a bathroom renovation...sent my step-son to Lowes for 12-2 Romex; & he comes back with yellow cable (the package is labeled 12-2G Type NM-B.)

I haven't done any wiring in years...so...is this something new?

Can I use it for typical interior 20 amp appliance circuits?

Thanks,

mark4man
 
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  #2  
Old 07-27-05, 08:10 PM
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That's exactly what you want for a 20A circuit.

"Romex" is a brand name, but is what most people call type NM cable. NM-B is 90 degree C wire, as opposed to older NM which was only rated 60 degree C. Lately the manufacturers have been color coding the cable. All I've seen has been white for 14 guage, yellow for 12 guage, and orange for 10 guage. These colors are not code though, so don't assume a color corresponds to a particular guage.

Are you up on current code for bathroom circuits?
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-05, 08:55 PM
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The G means Ground, indicating the cable has a ground wire as well as the 2 conducsors. NM means non-metallic, and thr B is the temperature rating of the cable.
 
  #4  
Old 07-28-05, 11:10 AM
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I think this is pretty new, because I'd never seen it before until recently when I had to buy some wire for a project. As it was explained to me, the cables are color coded to make it easier for the inspector to see that the correct sizes have been used. The colors of what I got are the same as chirkware said.
 
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Old 07-28-05, 11:19 AM
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Color coded cable are at least three years old, and is mainly for the installer's benefit. Color coding is not mandated by the NEC and colors could vary by cable manufacturer, so the inspector must still examine the cable.
 
  #6  
Old 07-28-05, 05:30 PM
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Thumbs up

Thanks everybody...

Very good info.

Are you up on current code for bathroom circuits?
There will be two circuits...one dedicated to a jacuzzi tub (> faceless GFI)...(tub motor lug grounded to cold water feed); & the other to the standard GFI's & lighting/switching. Both will be 20 amp. Is there anything else?

Thanks,

mark4man
 
  #7  
Old 07-28-05, 09:57 PM
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Make sure you have a receptacle within 36" of the rim of each sink, and don't put anything outside the bathroom on either circuit.
 
  #8  
Old 11-01-05, 09:41 PM
Bob B.
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Going back to Chirkware's answer regarding NM rated at 60 C and NM-B at 90---what is 75 degree C? An NM that's no longer made? What was the time period that 75 was made?
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-05, 10:11 PM
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Although a number of types of cable and wire is rated for 75-degrees (e.g., RHW, THHW, THWN, USE, ZW, RHW, THW, XHHW, UF), it was not commonly used indoors for residential dwellings.
 
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