Garage door opener wiring

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  #1  
Old 08-01-05, 06:23 AM
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Garage door opener wiring

My garage door opener uses a three-prong plug. Unfortunately, the only electrical supply that is practical to use as a power source is the light fixture in the center of the garage ceiling, into which the opener is currently plugged (using an adapter). Because there is no grounding conductor available, I figure that the best solution is to install a GFCI receptacle, tapping off the power for the light fixture. But Iíve never heard of a GFCI being mounted in a ceiling, and it would be a bit of a pain to reset it (pointed stick). Can I do this? Is there a better solution? Ideally, I would tap into the load side of the existing GFCI in the garage and use a conventional duplex recep., but there is no easy way to run the wiring.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-01-05, 07:09 AM
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Are you sure that there is no grounding available? Have you removed the light fixture and checked in the box? In what year was the house built?

BTW, those adaptors are absolutely terrible inventions, especially how you are using them. The light socket is designed to carry at most less than one amp, and you are using it to power a five-amp appliance. This is not a good idea. I'm glad you're getting away from it.
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-05, 07:21 AM
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Yes, I've checked. Only hot and neutral in the box, supplied by K&T in loom. Home built in 1966.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 07:28 AM
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Nobody was using K&T in 1966 (or even 1946), were they?

Is the electrical panel in the garage or basement?
 
  #5  
Old 08-01-05, 08:31 AM
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Believe it or not, it is K&T (although oddly enough, most of it was originally wired with a grounding conductor; not the attached garage, though. I've been in the attic space above the garage and there are no grounding conductors). The house is a split level, and the service panel is in the family room on the far side of the house from the garage. Fishing a separate ground (or a new NM cable) from the garage back to the panel would be well beyond my abilities.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 08:53 AM
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Okay, then I guess I'd put the GDO on a GFCI and see how it goes. If the GFCI trips often, I guess I'd consider other options (but none that I can officially recommend). Anything is better than what you have now.
 
  #7  
Old 08-01-05, 11:25 AM
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Thanks. I'm hoping that nuisance trips will be rare (or better yet, non-existent).
 
  #8  
Old 08-01-05, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by eclipse
Thanks. I'm hoping that nuisance trips will be rare (or better yet, non-existent).

My garage door opener has been on a GFCI protected circuit for over two years with no nuisance trips...
 
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