Help with Wiring a Cokktop

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  #1  
Old 08-08-05, 04:04 PM
hth
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Help with Wiring a Cooktop

I don't know if this is allowed per code. Before replacing the kitchen cabinets, the old 3-wire 220V circuit was in a box at a corner. From here they drilled a hole on the wall b/w the blind corner cabinet and the base for the cooktop and ran the power cord through it from the cooktop to the box at the corner. With new cabinets, the cabinets installer used the existing box at corner as j-box, made a new box right behind the base cabinet of cooktop and ran new wires from the j-box to this new box, just 2 feet from old box to new box. This way he said he didn't have to drill hole on the wall of new cabinets making it looks better. Is this OK to extend the existing circuit as he did or he had to run a completely new 4-wire circuit for the cooktop?
Thanks.
 

Last edited by hth; 08-08-05 at 04:33 PM. Reason: spelling
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  #2  
Old 08-08-05, 04:36 PM
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If the new cooktop required 4 wire I would have ran a new one back to the panel, you are not allowed to extend this circuit anyway and 4 wire is far superior.
 
  #3  
Old 08-08-05, 04:57 PM
hth
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I understand that the 4-wire circuit will protect me. However to explain the code it is not very straight forward. The manual of new cooktop lets owner to use old 3 wire circuit if allowed by city. The electrician I hired later to upgrade the panel also said it was fine to hook it up with 3 wires. He was not aware of the extending so let assume he thought it was from the old box. If it was OK to use 3 wire, all I need now is just to drill a hole on the wall b/s cabinets and wire the cooktop to the old box?

Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 08-08-05, 09:02 PM
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This is a judgment call for the inspector. It's a fuzzy line between a minor modification and a change significant enough to cancel the grandfathering exception. Two feet sounds minor to me, but it might not sound so minor to your inspector.
 
  #5  
Old 08-09-05, 11:25 AM
hth
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Size of Pipe?

It was my fault when I got the electrician's opinion after the cabinets installed. Too late to run new circuit without damaging drywall. And another reason holds me back. Here is how it looks. I replaced panel from 100A to 200A and also moved it to a new location. The electrician used old box as j-box and ran new wires inside a pipe from new box to the j-box . Later I asked the electrician: first time to run 3 new circuits, second time to replace 60A circuit to the garage. Both times he used new pipes and drilled the stucco to enter the attic from outside. So there are 3 pipes now from the new panel entering the house. I don't know if this time I ask him to run new circuit for the cooktop he will use another pipe. It really looks ugly with pipes at the panel. Can he use a bigger pipe now and if later I need to run new circuit he can use this pipe instead of cutting stucco for new pipe? Does code allow using bigger pipe in this case?
 
  #6  
Old 08-11-05, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by hth
It really looks ugly with pipes at the panel. Can he use a bigger pipe now and if later I need to run new circuit he can use this pipe instead of cutting stucco for new pipe? Does code allow using bigger pipe in this case?
There are a lot of rules regarding installation of wiring in conduit (pipe). There are certain situations where it would be okay to oversize conduit for future use, and there are situations where it would not be okay. Without knowing more about your structure and local codes, I can't give an accurate answer. The best thing to do would be to ask your electrician about it.

As a side note, conduit can be painted to match your house. That will make it a little easier on the eyes.
 
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