Exhisting panel or new sub-panel?

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  #1  
Old 08-09-05, 05:40 PM
DirtTrackArt
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Exhisting panel or new sub-panel?

I have a 20x20 building to wire but i have run into some questions. I don't know if I should run my circuits out of the exhisting panel or set a sub-panel. I will have 4 new circuits to run....1 for wall receps., 1 for lighting, 1 dedicated for an A.C. unit and the 4th for baseboard heat being a 220. The building is connected to the house so I don't need to run underground. The panel is located in the basement about 65ft. from the wiring area to be done. Seems like long runs to me. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 08-09-05, 05:45 PM
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Location: welland ontario
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I'm not sure from your description if you have power in the building. If not hten you will need a sub panel. You are not allowed to run more than one circuit to an out building.
If the panel is in the building then no problem running your circuits from the panel. 65 feet is not long. 200 feet would be long.
 
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Old 08-09-05, 05:50 PM
DirtTrackArt
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Sorry I didn't specify. The building is an addition/ garage in the future. It's part of the home. I was going to use 14-2 romex for receps. and lights....should I use 12-2 instead due to the length?
 
  #4  
Old 08-09-05, 07:21 PM
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Don't use 14-2 for receptacles. Use 12-2 for receptacles, and make them 20 amp circuits. And those receptacles MUST be GFCI protected. I would probably run two circuits for wall receptacles, alternating every other receptacle.
 
  #5  
Old 08-10-05, 08:49 AM
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Location: Dry Side of Washington State
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Originally Posted by DirtTrackArt
I have a 20x20 building to wire but i have run into some questions. I don't know. The building is connected to the house so I don't need to run underground.
joed quote- You are not allowed to run more than one circuit to an out building.

Don't think this applies in his case. He said the building is attached to the house.

DirtTrackArt - you could buy one of these ac/heat combo units and use only one circuit to supply it. As oppossed to 2 separate circuits for the a/c and baseboard heater.

Look for combination a/c and heat on this web page:

http://www.coolyourroom.com/

Here's a link to Frigidaire's a/c and heat combo unit:

http://www.frigidaire.com/products/r...d_FAH12EP2.asp
 

Last edited by thinman; 08-10-05 at 09:22 AM.
  #6  
Old 08-10-05, 09:58 AM
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Location: port chester n y
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I advise a 100 Feeder to a sub-panel. Reasons?----------

Much easier to run one 100 amp cable then five or six 15/20/40 amp cables.

All you need at the Service is space for one 2-pole breaker.

One Equiptment Grounding Conductor connection at the Service panel instead of 5-6 EGC's.

The work for a 100 amp cable is the same as the work for a 40/60 amp cable.

The cost-difference between 40/60/ cables and a100 amp cable is not that excessive.

You will have "reserve power" and provisions for future circuits with maximum "flexibility" with the S-P--for maximum safety, you can protect certain 2-wire circuits with GFI breakers.

The circuit-protection is adjacent to the connected loads.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!
 
  #7  
Old 08-11-05, 03:37 PM
DirtTrackArt
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If I make my receps. all GFCI, can they be wired as switch receps? How many GFCI's can be on one circuit? Also, I was going to use 14-2 for lighting...should I step that up to 12-2 w/20amp also?
 
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