Kitchen circuits

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Old 08-11-05, 09:24 AM
paulam2
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Kitchen circuits

I'm getting ready to gut my kitchen and remodel, and I'm planning the electrical circuits. I've read and/or heard that the current code requires a separate circuit for each built in appliance (including the garbage disposal and microwave if it's "built in"), but I can't find any reference to this in the code. In fact, the text and drawing in section 210.52 makes it sound to me like I could supply all of the appliances in the kitchen from two 20-amp circuit (or whatever I need to provide sufficient power to the appliances).

Can someone tell me if I'm missing something? Do I really need a dedicate circuit for each appliance?
 
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Old 08-11-05, 10:03 AM
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Since this is you'r kitchen ( "custom" job?), and you will "have to live with it", it's in your best interests to avoid a design that is Code-compliant in terms of power-capacity.The primary purpose of the NEC is saftey, and fire-prevention.The NEC requirements are MINIMUM requirements.

The minimum power capacity , measured in Watts,for a kitchen is two 20-amp "small-appliance" circuits. The power-capacity = 2 X (20 amps x 120 volts ) =4800 watts.

4800 - refrigerator - microwave - disposal = available power for other appliances.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 10:08 AM
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The two required small-appliance circuits are for receptacles serving the countertop only (plus optionally the refrigerator, but I recommend against it). They absolutely may not be used for the disposal, dishwasher, or built-in microwave.

As PATTBAA said, it would be foolish to skimp on your own kitchen. You'll save $20, but regret it forever.
 
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Old 08-11-05, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by paulam2
I'm getting ready to gut my kitchen and remodel, and I'm planning the electrical circuits. I've read and/or heard that the current code requires a separate circuit for each built in appliance (including the garbage disposal and microwave if it's "built in"), but I can't find any reference to this in the code. In fact, the text and drawing in section 210.52 makes it sound to me like I could supply all of the appliances in the kitchen from two 20-amp circuit (or whatever I need to provide sufficient power to the appliances).

Can someone tell me if I'm missing something? Do I really need a dedicate circuit for each appliance?
The 2 or more dedicated small-appliance branch circuits cannot have anything else connected to them except the refrigeraion equipment or other small loads, clock, gas range electrical components.

NEC uses the phrase 'fastened in place' for built in appliances.

See 2005 NEC articles 210.23(A)(1) & (2).

It's always a good idea to have a dedicated microwave branch circuit. I think most microwave manufacturers recommend a dedicated circuit. It's a code requirement to follow the manufacturer's instructions.
 
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