How do you pros do it?

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Old 08-20-05, 06:37 PM
WGW
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How do you pros do it?

The 58 year old two storey house we're moving into next week still has the original K&T wiring throughout.
I'm planning to rewire the entire house and through reading here and other sources have most problems solved.
I'm assuming that I'll be able to drill a large enough hole from the crawlspace in the attic down through the common interior wall plates to the basement using extensions on a hole saw, pulling wires up then dropping the new wires down to each bedroom outlet and ceiling switch (separate circuits of course).
The one thing I can't find info on is how one runs wire to main floor ceiling lights with minimal wall/ceiling cutting.
Also, if I ran the cabling for our computer hub along side those new wires in the wall, would it cause any problem?
I'd planned on doing all the bullwork myself, then calling in an electrician to do the breaker panel hookup and the new outside post, figuring that Hydro one will more co-operate with someone licensed than just a home owner when it comes time to connect to the pole out in the street.

Am I on the right track, or is there something I should be aware of?

Regards
 
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Old 08-21-05, 07:41 PM
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Are the walls drywall, or lath and plaster?

Some wall damage when installing first-floor ceiling fixtures in unavoidable. Just get it over with and repair it afterwards. Look at the pictures in various home wiring books will give you ideas on how not to create any more damage than you have to.

Keep your communications cables at least a foot away from your electrical cables or you might get interference.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 10:32 AM
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Also, if I ran the cabling for our computer hub along side those new wires in the wall, would it cause any problem?
Why not go wireless? It is much easier to work with than running ethernet cables all over the place.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by dzdave00
Why not go wireless? It is much easier to work with than running ethernet cables all over the place.

DZDAVE is right...... I went wireless a month ago.... cheap ($69.00), easy, and reliable.... you'll spend that much time/money routing cables...
 
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Old 08-22-05, 01:06 PM
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For data, wireless is definitely the way to go. Just make sure you know how to secure your wireless network properly. i.e. change the default passwords, enable encryption, etc. You can easilly find this information online though.

As for running lines to the ceiling fixtures, go to your local library and see if they have one of the electrical books from the Time-Life home improvement series. I have the whole series (from the late 80's I think), and it has some good diagrams which show you how to overcome some of these problems.

Some of the instructions need to be updated, but it's a good place to get started.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 02:18 PM
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This is more for the Voice and Data Communications subforum, but I guess I'm alone in saying not to just go wireless. Yes, wireless is easy, but it's slower and less reliable. Depending on your homes size, one wireless router may not provide the coverage you need. I'd at least put SOME Cat5 in the walls while they are open where it's not too hard to do.

My wireless router is convenient, and plenty fast enough for web surfing (slow for the occasional large data transfers though). However, the signal in the master bedroom (furthest from the router) is poor. This is a small house, with paneling. A large, older house (possibly with plastered walls) would probably have some dead areas, or at least some areas with poor reception.

A mix of wired and wireless is often the best solution. Wireless access points at exteme ends of the house, with the two connected by Cat5 may work for you.

Definately do not run your Cat5 parallel to your electrical lines for any significant distance without reasonable spacing between them. One foot is a good minimum. Also, when they must cross, try to cross the two at 90 degree angles if possible.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 04:11 PM
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Be aware that there might be fire stops or bracing preventing you from running wire all the way to the basement from the second floor ceiling.
 
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Old 08-22-05, 05:57 PM
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Thanks for the replies

To answer your question John, the walls are plaster and lath.

Joed; Could'nt I drill through those wall braces or firestops as well?

In planning this job, I'm wondering if it might be better to run conduit up an outside wall from the basement and into the attic/crawlspace instead of trying to drill down through two floors (if that's an acceptable method).
What method would an electrician use? and which would an inspector most likely approve?
I'm not afraid of a tedious job, nor of fishing wires...I just want to do it right the first time.

Regards
 
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Old 08-23-05, 07:05 AM
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Running conduit on the exterior is sometimes done, but it's usually a good idea only if it's on some side of the house that is never seen, since it's pretty ugly.
 
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Old 08-23-05, 05:45 PM
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You could drill though the fire stops as well. The problem is they are probably half way down the wall. You will need a very long drill and it will be difficult to fish the wire though the hole.
 
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Old 08-24-05, 08:52 AM
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Drilling from attic through 2 floors will not be feasible. You won't find a drill bit long enough, and if you do you won't be able to manage the length of it in the attic space.

You can carefully measure and mark the location of the sill plate in the basement/ top plate in the attic and drill holes as needed. Then you'll have to open up the wall in either the main floor close to the ceiling, or in the 2nd floor close to the floor, so that you can drill through the top plate of the 1st floor wall, the floor and subfloor, and the bottom plate of the 2nd floor wall. Then get out the fish tape, find a friend, and pray-like-crazy that the holes have all lined up and their are not firestops (like joed pointed out).

You can run Romex up the outside wall in a conduit sleeve. If you run more than one Romex run, you'll need to derate the ampacity.

Before you go ahead with running up the outside wall, take a carefull look at your floorplans. You may be able to build a wire-chase into existing closets. You can even build a chase up an inside wall as long as you do a good job with the drywall. You will need to carefully seal around all penetrations in ceilings and floors with firestop caulking.

If you're planning on hiring an electrician for parts of the job, talk to him about options. He'll have some good ideas. Also, be aware that many electricians will refuse to hook circuits up to the panel if they have not wired the entire circuit -- if anything goes wrong with the connections you've wired, they may be liable because their name is on the work. You'll want the electrician to connect your service and install the panel. If you do some research, you can do all the rest. If the work is done correctly, you should not have any trouble passing the electrical inspection. The ESA inspectors are very helpful.

If this is new to you, I'd recommend Wiring A House, by Rex Cauldwell. Wiring Simplified, by P.S. Knight is available at Home Depot for $15 and will answer most of your Ontario Electrical Code questions. You can also go to the ESA website FAQ link www.esasafe.com to review common questions and answers. You can also ask the inspector questions by sending an email at the same link.
 

Last edited by Mr Fixit eh; 08-24-05 at 09:03 AM.
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Old 08-24-05, 05:52 PM
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You might luck out and have a balloon frame house, which is usually open from the basement (maybe with a base sill to drill through), through to the attic.
 
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Old 08-24-05, 06:27 PM
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Mr Fixit eh;
I was planning on welding a 3/4" speedbit to threaded rod cut in about 4 or 5' incriments.
That way I'd be able to connect extentions as needed to get through the first floor top plate and second floor bottom plate either from the basement or the attic and still have minimal flexing of the rod.
Questions if you will?
1: Am I correct that I'd need a seperate hole for each wire run?
2: Would junction boxes for outlet runs to the bedrooms be acceptable in the attic space?
3: I'd planned on wiring the 3 bedroom lights on one circuit, and 3 more circuits to feed each bedrooms wall outlets(there are 3 outlets in each room).
Of course, the bathroom would have its own circuit as well.

Does this sound safe? and do-able?

As an afterthought, there is a washroom vent pipe in the basement whos cutout would provide a very convenient place to run wires to the attic with no drilling at all... is that an acceptable option?

Thanks in advance

Regards
 
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Old 08-25-05, 07:32 AM
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1. Not necessarily. You can usually run two or three cables through the same set of holes.

2. Junction boxes are acceptable if they are permanently accessible. Most attics allow reasonable accesibility.

3. Sounds fine.

It's okay to run electrical cables along the side of plumbing vent pipes.
 
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