Sub-panel used to feed 2nd sub-panel?

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  #1  
Old 08-29-05, 12:34 PM
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Sub-panel used to feed 2nd sub-panel?

Can a sub-panel be used to feed another sub-panel?

Regards,
Mike
 
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  #2  
Old 08-29-05, 01:10 PM
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Yes, that is acceptable.

You need to be aware that grounds and neutrals must remain isolated in the new subpanel, just like in your existing subpanel. Also, the existing panel and the building's main service must have the availible capacity to support the new loads served by the new subpanel.
 
  #3  
Old 08-29-05, 01:11 PM
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Although you can, there are many reasons why it might not be the best idea.
 
  #4  
Old 08-29-05, 05:23 PM
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ibpooks and John,

Thank you both for your insight.

John: Could you elaborate a bit on why it may not be a good idea to feed a sub from a sub.

Thank you for your time.

Regards,
Mike
 
  #5  
Old 08-29-05, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike_P
ibpooks and John,

Thank you both for your insight.

John: Could you elaborate a bit on why it may not be a good idea to feed a sub from a sub.

Thank you for your time.

Regards,
Mike
I'm not speaking for John but to me it means that you have a high risk of overloading your service. It also becomes a mess with several panels tapped down stream from the original panel.

It sounds to me like you need to increase your main panel. I would guess with all the circuits that you are needing, you are maxing out the main.
 
  #6  
Old 08-29-05, 07:05 PM
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Man, I got subs on subs,,, ha, one sub with 4 of them hooked to it plus a couple other circuits. I have another panel feeding 5 subs and one of those feeding one and another main panel feeding 4, but as these guys eluded to the loads were calculated, most having a 90A wire with a 60A breaker, fed from a main service that isnt overloaded. The main advantage while delivering good service via large conductors is for ease of branch circuit protection, not that there is really much actual load hooked to all of this.
 
  #7  
Old 08-30-05, 06:54 AM
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A 60-amp subpanel from a 60-amp subpanel means that you're limited to 60 amps total from the two subpanels combined. But if you ran both 60-amp subpanels from the main, you would have twice the available power from the two subpanels. Whether or not it's a good idea depends on what loads are run from each subpanel. It's normally a good idea to keep the largest loads back on the main panel. The concern in all of this is that by partitioning the available power, you limit your flexibility. So you need to partition it with careful design.
 
  #8  
Old 08-30-05, 03:00 PM
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John,

Thank you for your explanation. It is genuinely appreciated.

Regards,
Mike
 
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