Working with UF-B cable

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Old 09-02-05, 08:51 PM
colpaarm
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Working with UF-B cable

Okay, so I've built a tool shed from scratch and it looks great. I decided from the beginning that it had to have electricity, so I wired up everything inside, got a trencher and ran a line to my house and now just need to make the final connections. So I got an appropriate sub-panel for my the circuits and added the breakers to the sub and connected everything. Great, now all I have to do is wire up the UF-B cable to the subpanel, close it, the connect the wire to my main panel.

Okay, UF-B 10/3 cable is thick and hard as heck. Are there specials tools to work with this hard thick plastic? Thanks for any help you can give.
 
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Old 09-03-05, 05:44 AM
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Not really......you want to take a knife and cut down about 3/4" between each section of wire and then using a set of pliers you should be able to pull each wire down the right amount and it will peel from the jacket.

Hard to visual I am sure....but once you cut it down between each wire segement it will look like a 4 tooth comb on the end....any better visual?

Is this work shed detached from the house....if so I will assume you ran multiple circuits in the shed and what size panel did you run...if it is less than 6 branch circuits you can use a main lug only sub-panel.....also did you run its own ground rod setup and so on....Just checking....
 
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Old 09-03-05, 09:57 AM
colpaarm
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Okay, yeah, I see where you're going with this. I'll try that.

Is this work shed detached from the house....
Yes it is. About 25 feet or so from the back of the house.

if so I will assume you ran multiple circuits in the shed and what size panel did you run...
Yes, I'm running three circuits.

if it is less than 6 branch circuits you can use a main lug only sub-panel.....
The subpanel has exactly six circuits and I'm using three of them. One for the receptacles, one for the lights and one for a GFCI outlet right by the door on the outside. The panel I purchased is a main lug subpanel. Now I don't know if it's a main lug "only" subpanel. It's a square d model number 612L100SCP, although I couldn't find that on the internet. I'll keep looking and see what I come up with.

also did you run its own ground rod setup and so on....Just checking....
It's funny that you ask because I had asked about this and was told by someone that it was overkill. And the home depot book didn't recommend it either. For what any of that is worth! Then I go to my friend's house yesterday and he has a HUGE three car garage. Much larger than the shed I built. However, I noticed that he had a subpanel in there and it had it's own ground. Looks like someone was too lazy to run the wires neatly, but it was definitely done. Do you think I can get away with not having one or is it a must? If so, I'll add one.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 09-03-05, 03:26 PM
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Yes, add the grounding rod. And make sure all the receptacles are GFCI protected. By code, your UF-B should have been buried at least 24 inches deep. I hope that's true. And be sure to keep the neutrals and grounding wires isolated in the shed (which means that they must terminate on separate bars in the subpanel, and that you must discard the bonding screw or strap that came with the panel).
 
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Old 09-06-05, 06:47 PM
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Yeppers...Neatness should count for something but sad to say not everyone thinks that way....We take pride in our work even if we are the only ones that will ever see it once the walls are up...anyway the reason the friend might not have had a ground rod issue for the garage is it may have been attached which in that case he could have ran (4) wire and did not need to run a ground rod...in your case the shed is detached and over 1 branch circuit so a ground rod is in order in this case.....drive that thing down fella...

See...it pays to come to the forum as ask versus listening to the guy that is using the OVERKILL comments...lol
 
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