How does rough inspection happen for rework?

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  #1  
Old 09-03-05, 01:57 PM
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Question How does rough inspection happen for rework?

Hi,

We want to change a switched outlet (for a lamp) to a switched ceiling light. The code says that switched ceiling lights need a wall switch by each room entrance. I will need to add a switch by one entrance and change the circuits to get the existing switch off the outlet circuit and tied into a ceiling circuit.

I think I only need a small hole in the sheetrock near one outlet and everything else can be done by snaking wires to the 2 switch boxes.

Is that generally acceptable for the rough inspection? Can I avoid opening the sheetrock any more than I described or do they want to see how wires are stapled etc.?

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-03-05, 02:12 PM
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Not sure I understand. Why do you need a new switch? Why can't you use the existing switch?
 
  #3  
Old 09-03-05, 02:22 PM
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As I understand the code... it says that there needs to be a switch at each room entrance for a ceiling light that is the primary room light. We only have 1 switch presently (for the switched outlet which will become a normal outlet) but we have 2 room entrances. Making the change would require bringing things up to code w/2 switches.
 
  #4  
Old 09-03-05, 02:28 PM
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I assume by reading your post that you have a single switch in the room controlling the outlet. According to you, your local code requires a switch by each door to a room to control the new light fixture (odd). Correct me if I'm wrong. If I'm right......

This means you're going to have to add a "three way" switch (actually, two of them) to the room (assuming you have two doors to the room in question, requiring two switches). To do so you'll need 14/3 wire from one switch to the other - possibly a difficult task to snake through. There are a myriad of ways to run wiring for 3 way switches... Considering the fact that your switch already controls a length of 'probably 14/2" to the existing outlet.... I would try to run my "power wire" off of that to the new fixture. Or.. if it's easier to run new wire from the new fixture to one of the switches... that's an option too...

Whatever way you go it is going to mean running wire through walls/ceiling and what not....

You should figure out what method of wiring the new fixture works within your "snaking paramaters".... and go from there....

By the way.... not a pro... just make do with what I've got.... You may get a lot better advice from an electrical type expert on this forum....
 
  #5  
Old 09-03-05, 03:04 PM
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You don't need a switch near each door, just near one door.
 
  #6  
Old 09-03-05, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
You don't need a switch near each door, just near one door.
I could be mistaken on that... but my wife definitely wants it. Required or not, my question is really about how rough inspection works for added/changed sections of circuits and new J boxes or switch boxes.

If I can get the box mounted in the wall and wires safely snaked to it, what is the inspector looking for at rough-in? Do they simply look in the box and see the cable(s) clamped in and tell you to go ahead and finish wiring? Do they expect to have an access hole in the drywall to see how the wire is run or stapled? That's what I'm after - I've only done wiring in new construction areas and not dealt with existing walls.

Thanks.

 

Last edited by syakoban; 09-04-05 at 07:22 AM. Reason: typo
  #7  
Old 09-04-05, 08:19 AM
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Is that generally acceptable for the rough inspection?
Yes.
Can I avoid opening the sheetrock any more than I described or do they want to see how wires are stapled etc.?
No stapling needed for cables fished inside finished walls.
 
  #8  
Old 09-05-05, 06:54 AM
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Inspection? Not sure where you are located, but I don't know of any city in my area that would even require a permit for this level of work. That is not to say you should do anything less than code, but your original question was in regard to rough inspection. A professional licensed electrician would not be required to take out a permit for this type of work around here.
 
  #9  
Old 09-05-05, 07:09 PM
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Wink

I'm in NJ... it's easier to talk about the few things you can do without a permit than the things that need a permit. Any change to the electrical system other than replacing switches, outlets, and existing fixtures with like replacements needs a permit...

Oh and we CAN change light bulbs ourselves too! Thank you local inspector.
 
  #10  
Old 09-06-05, 08:18 AM
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Call the inspection office and ask what they expect for the rough inspection. Normally at rough you have everything connected except the devices. The grounds are connected. Any wires not connecting to the devices are connected together. You will not be required to cut holes to staple wires inside a finished wall.
 
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