Electric Heat Question

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-10-05, 09:40 AM
Bob53's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Derry, New Hampshire
Posts: 291
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Electric Heat Question

Greetings, I have a 20A circuit with nothing on it at all. It goes to a small insulated room 8x14 with 7.5 ft ceilings. Am I better off using a double pole breaker(30A)hard wiring a baseboard element or should I just use something portable. This room will be used all winter. I have the room in my panel to switch out the single pole 20A and install a double pole 30A. Running the #10 NMis not a problem with my unfinished basement.
THANKS.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-10-05, 10:28 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Does this room have power any other way, such as from lighting circuits? You clearly need lights and wall receptacles, in addition to heat.

As for supplying heat, you may not need more than a 20 amp circuit for baseboard heat. From a 20 amp 240 volt circuit you can get a lot of heat before the maxing out the circuit.
 
  #3  
Old 09-10-05, 02:12 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Portable space heaters are for temporary usage in unusual situations. When you can anticipate the need for electrical heat in advance, install baseboard heaters on dedicated 240-volt circuit(s). It'll be much safer and much more comfortable.
 
  #4  
Old 09-10-05, 02:41 PM
Bob53's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Derry, New Hampshire
Posts: 291
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
yes, I do have a separate circuit for general purpose lighting and receptacles. This circuit 20A 220V will be for this electric baseboard. So, is it ok to leave the #12 wire or should it be upgraded to #10?
THANKS. p.s. (I have not yet purchased the unit) should I purchase it first to make sure that just the 3 conductors are fine or might a new unit need 4 conductors? 12/2, 12/3, 10/2, or 10/3 ?
THANKS.
 
  #5  
Old 09-10-05, 03:23 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
#12 is enough for 20 amps.

It's always a good idea to purchase (or at least select and read the installation instructions for) the appliance before you wire the circuit for it. 12/2 should be fine. It is extremely unlikely that you'd need 12/3.
 
  #6  
Old 09-10-05, 03:25 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Straight baseboard heat is 240 volts. There is no need for a neutral. However, you need to do a calculation to determine how much heat you need. This will factor in the area of the country you live in, whether the areas on any side or below this room are heated, etc. This will let you know how much heat you need, which will dictate the wire size and the breaker size.
 
  #7  
Old 09-11-05, 09:14 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Leave the wire you have there alone, use that for your lighting/outlets.
Add a 12/2 for the baseboard heating.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: