Wiring 220Volts from a Breaker

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  #1  
Old 09-13-05, 01:30 PM
stevea
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Smile Wiring 220Volts from a Breaker

For all the brilliant minds out there, what is the method and how does one deliver a 220 volts from a breaker to it's destination? Simply put: Some help with 220 volts wiring for an A/C Unit. It's possible that this question had been tackled before, I am a new kid on the block.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 01:40 PM
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In simplest terms, wires are what deliver 240 volts from a breaker to its destination. You need two.

Is this central air, or a window unit? What are the electrical specs of the unit (read them off the unit itself or off the installation instructions)? Are you going to add a new circuit for this unit?

Before offering you any advice, we need a lot more information about your project.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 04:14 PM
stevea
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This unit is a window unit. In regards to the electrical specs of the unit, it is a 220 Volts and 15 Amps. No, I will not be adding a new circuit for this unit. unit?

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 04:21 PM
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Do you already have a 240 volt circuit where you want the air conditioner? If not, do you have a 120 volt circuit that only goes to a receptacle at the window? If you don't, then you certainly will be adding a circuit, or you won't be using your air conditioner.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 04:55 PM
stevea
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I appreciate the question.

No, I do not have a 240 volts circuit presently (That's why I'd like to know how to), however, there is a 110 volts terminal below where the A/C is/will be located.

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 05:20 PM
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Unless this is a dedicated 120 volt circuit with nothing else on it, you cannot use it.

What you need is a dedicated 240 volt circuit that is either 15 or 20 amps. Dedicated means nothing else on it. One single receptacle.

As an alternative, you can turn a dedicated 120 volt circuit into a 240 volt circuit, but it must be a dedicated circuit, with nothing else on it.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 06:08 PM
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No, I will not be adding a new circuit for this unit.
No, I do not have a 240 volts circuit presently
These two statements are contradictory.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 08:39 PM
stevea
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ok, ok.
I will be adding a new circuit, a 240 Volts, 15 amps circuit.
In regards to the 110 volts, that is what I presently have, obviously is not 240 volts, so folks what I need is how to wire a 240 volts from the circuit breaker to the delivery point.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-13-05, 08:59 PM
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You will need to use what is called a "double pole breaker" in your panel. You may see similar breakers in the panel now...they are literally 2 breakers with the handles linked together mechanically so they will always be both on, or both off. The 2 are necessary because your panel contains two busses which are each 120 with respect to the neutral wire, but are 240 across the 2. You would run a 4 conductor wire ( black, red, white, bare copper ). This wire will be called 14/3 wg ( 3 # 14 plus ground)

The black and red wires will connect to the 2 poles of the breaker. The white will be the neutral, and the bare of course is ground. 14 gauge wire is adequate for a 15 amp circuit, but if you used 12 gauge you would have the ability in the future to upgrade to 20 amp breakers for larger equipment.

You must match a receptacle specifically rated at 240 volts, 15 amps to this breaker. ( Each voltage and current range has a specific arrangement of the blades on the receptacle. so that it is not possible to plug an appliance into a receptacle which is either improper voltage, or too low current rating.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 05:28 AM
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While I do recommend 12 gage wire, I do not recommend 12/3. I recommend 12/2 wire. Your air conditioner does not need a neutral wire, and you will have no place to connect it at the receptacle for the air conditioner.

Use 12-2 wire for this circuit, using the white and the black wires for the two hot leads. Re-identify the white wire as hot using a black or blue permanent marker on the insulation.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 08:10 AM
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This would be a good time to point out that this is not a good introductory project for an electrical novice. So if you are an electrical novice (and you do sound like one), consider whether professional help might be warranted.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 09:27 AM
stevea
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To All who advised me on this issue, I sincerely appreciate your wise counsels.
In fact there are devices out there that can take two 110 Volts from (different [independent] sources) and make a lemonade (240 volts) out of them with their respective current specs.

Very true, a novice should not attempt a professional job.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 09:41 AM
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Do not under any circumstances try to use one of those devices you are referring to. They would require that you have two dedicated circuits from different legs of your incoming 240 volts at the location where you want the 240 volts.

Unless someone has added circuits, you don't have one dedicated circuit where you need it, let alone 2.

You need to run a new 240 volt circuit to this window for your air conditioner. Period. No other solution makes sense or is safe for your setup.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 10:39 AM
stevea
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Point well taken.

Thanks
 
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