50 Amp to 30 Amp outlet conversion for new dryer

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  #1  
Old 09-19-05, 10:51 AM
Mike_97402
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50 Amp to 30 Amp outlet conversion for new dryer

I recently moved into a house that has a 50 Amp 3 prong outlet for the dryer. my new dryer is 3 prong, 30 Amp. I've read around that this shouldn't matter, but the service folks (Sears) delivering the dryer will not install it if I don't have a 30 Amp outlet. My question is, if I replace the outlet, do I also need to replace the breaker with a 30 Amp breaker (makes sense that I should, but I wanted to get some opinions.)

also any advice surrounding this scenario is appreciated.

Many Thanks.
 
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Old 09-19-05, 10:59 AM
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You need to replace the breaker with a 30 amp breaker, and install the proper receptacle. Since you are doing this much work, I would certainly replace the cable so that you have a four wire cable and a four prong receptacle.
 
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Old 09-19-05, 11:36 AM
Mike_97402
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Clarifying question: Run 4 wires, even if the new dryer only has a 3 prong plug?
 
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Old 09-19-05, 11:39 AM
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The new dryer will come with a four prong plug as standard. All new dryers are that way. That cable can be replaced with a three prong plug if the dryer is connected to an existing three prong receptacle.

Since you don't have a receptacle in place, you have to buy one anyway. An inspector might force you install a four prong receptacle, meaning four wire cable.
 
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Old 09-19-05, 12:09 PM
Mike_97402
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Gotcha.

Thanks
 
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Old 09-19-05, 12:34 PM
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"4 wires" refers to 3 circuit-conductors and an Equiptment Grounding Conductor (EGC).

IF-repeat IF- the existing cable between the appliance and the panel does not have provide an EGC, the NEC permits using the Neutral (Whire wire) conductor of the cable to Ground the frame of the dryer if certain conditions are satisfied.One condition is that the circuit is an existing one. This will allow connecting a 4-slot receptacle to a "3-wire" circuit.

If the existing cable is Armored Cable, or a Non-metallic cable with a bare Grounding conductor, then there is a "usable" EGC available for connecting the 4-slot receptacle without resorting to using the Neutral for Grounding the appliance.
 
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