Too few sockets

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-27-05, 12:02 PM
vap
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Too few sockets

So my girlfriend moved into this apartment last year and everything with the electrical systems arent so bad, only that there are too few sockets in the apartment. its a fairly large two bedroom apartment with 7 sockets in the whole place. one in each room one in the kitchen one in the hall, one in the bathroom and two in the living room. Every place I have lived in have had many more sockets at least 2 in each room. I am an enectronic and computer head and this is not nearly enough to keep everyone in the apartment satisfied.I dont knowmuch about electrical work but I was wondering if there is a way I can split the sockets, not with those 6-way sockets but maybe take one socket and add a new socket to the room connecting it to one of the other sockets to get power without having to go behind the wall

I would like to route the wires on the outside of the wall and maybe put a casing around it. I have searched around the internet but its not easy to find what what you need when you dont have the right wording....anyway any help appreciated
thanks
~Vap
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-27-05, 12:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
A shortage of outlets often goes hand-in-hand with a lack of grounding and a shortage of power. A shortage of outlets can be corrected with power strips. But to solve a lack of grounding and/or a shortage of power, the easiest solution is to move to a different apartment. Leave this apartment to somebody with more modest electrical needs.

Tenants can legally do no electrical work.
 
  #3  
Old 09-27-05, 12:16 PM
vap
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
..

2 year lease...
 
  #4  
Old 09-27-05, 12:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
So try surge-suppressing power strips. If the power strip turns on the light that indicates no grounding, then you'll just have to take the risk of poor surge suppression. If the breaker or fuse starts blowing, you'll have to give up some appliances. Make minimal use of hair dryers, don't buy any space heaters, use an inkjet rather than a laser printer, and keep your light bulbs no more than 60 watts.

If you must use extension cords, keep them as heavy and short as possible and don't run them under the carpet.
 
  #5  
Old 09-27-05, 01:09 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,339
Ask the landlord if he would be willing to let you hire an electrician to add some circuits and receptacles; it's a win-win situation for him and you. You're paying to add value to his property, and you get an apartment that better meets your needs. He may even be willing to split the cost with you if he's a really nice guy. In most places, only a licensed electrician is allowed to perform work on rental property. Sometimes even the landlord is not allowed to do electrical work.
 
  #6  
Old 09-27-05, 01:28 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,287
Check this site, then go to any big box store. They have this or a variation
which should do what you want.

http://www.wiremold.com/
 
  #7  
Old 09-27-05, 02:22 PM
d2frette
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I thought that code required at least 1 outlet for every 8' of wall?
no?
 
  #8  
Old 09-27-05, 02:59 PM
vap
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
meh

Originally Posted by goldstar
Check this site, then go to any big box store. They have this or a variation
which should do what you want.

http://www.wiremold.com/
wow appreciated..any more sites like this keep em commin plz...
 
  #9  
Old 09-27-05, 04:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 857
Originally Posted by d2frette
I thought that code required at least 1 outlet for every 8' of wall?
no?
That is correct. You need at least one outlet every 8 feet by code. Ths code requirement is to avoid having extension cords etc.

This apartment sounds like a fire waiting to happen.

I would request the landlord bring the apartment up to code or else you move out.
 
  #10  
Old 09-27-05, 05:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
I thought that code required at least 1 outlet for every 8' of wall?
First if all, the current National Electrical Code only requires a receptacle for every 12 feet of wall. And second, the NEC does not apply retroactively. Any structure built in compliance with the code in effect at the time it was built is allowed to stay that way forever. So it's unlikely that citing the code is going to solve this problem.
 
  #11  
Old 09-27-05, 05:23 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
There is no code requirement for a receptacle every 8 feet in the US. The rules vary by location within a residence. Kitchen counter tops are every four feet, bedrooms and living rooms are every 12 feet, for example.

However, those rules are newer than some houses. There is no code requirement that an existing residence has to be brought up to code except when renovations are done.

The existing wiring is not a fire waiting to happen just because it was wired years ago. It may be if the wiring is damaged, or if the wiring is over fused, but it is not just because it is old.

All of this should have been brought up before a lease is signed, when your girlfriend had more bargaining power, but it is not too late. Make an offer to split the costs and see what you can work out. Perhaps you can work out something whereby a few new circuits are added in appropriate places,
 
  #12  
Old 09-27-05, 06:04 PM
ElectricalMan's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Harrisonburg
Posts: 744
Howdy......Just to add to this in case you are going to pull out the old code book...the article John is refering to is Art 210-52(a)(1) just in case you would like to review it for clarity. It is also to take a gander at Art 210-52(a)(2) as well which cover wall spaces and what is considered as such.

Hope this helps.....

P.S. As John said........has nothing to do with a 8" wall space
 
  #13  
Old 09-28-05, 06:33 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 857
The OP did not mention where he is located. Some codes do require an outlet every 8 feet. Mine does.
 
  #14  
Old 09-28-05, 07:47 AM
d2frette
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I guess it doesn't matter what the code says. For some reason, I thought that apartments had to be kept up to date with current codes. I realize that older homes don't have to be retro-fitted to the new code when they are sold. But, I suppose if I were a landlord, I wouldn't want to have to reinspect my apts everytime the apt was turned to a new leasee.

I really did think that code required an outlet for every 8' of perimeter around living space (so closests didn't count, garages don't count, hallways don't count). I'm not a pro though, just stating what I had previously thought.

Do most local codes in us cities require an outlet every 8' or 12' or something? Or, phrased differently, is this quite common for local codes?
 
  #15  
Old 09-28-05, 07:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Most jurisdictions in the US adopt the NEC. They may be an edition or two behind, they stay fairly current. Sometimes they will add additional codes, sometimes they will exclude certain sections.

I don't know of too many that change the requirements for receptacle spacing, so the NEC applies.

Those requirements for bedrooms are no more than six feet from a door, and then every 12 feet thereafter. Generally speaking, at least one per wall is required.
 
  #16  
Old 09-28-05, 08:13 AM
d2frette
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
thanks. sorry if I have hijacked the thread!
 
  #17  
Old 09-28-05, 10:19 AM
noncom
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Ok code in new construction requires outlets every 12 feet, I assume closer is acceptable. Are Outlets inside closets acceptable? I am putting up a dormer, and the architect has specified an outlet and a light in a walk in closet. I know, or believe i have read, certain light fixtures are not permitted in closet, I have check what type. I always thought oulets in the closets were a no-no too. Is there any rule with reguard to where an outlet can not be placed in a room?
 
  #18  
Old 09-28-05, 11:01 AM
d2frette
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Again, not a pro here, but I am buying a new construction house. I requested and received an outlet in a closet. I live in an apt right now, and it has an outlet in the coat closet.

I cannot imaging a rule stating "no outlet here or there." However, I would venture to guess that the outlet in a closet does not count towards the 1 outlet per 12' wall space.
 
  #19  
Old 09-28-05, 12:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Receptacles in closets are allowed but not required.
 
  #20  
Old 09-28-05, 01:55 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,287
A most interesting and insightfull discussion of the codes, but I think we lost sight of the origional question which VAP asked. By his reply, wiremold or the equivilent is what he was looking for.
 
  #21  
Old 09-28-05, 02:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
No, wiremold is not what he should be looking for. If he decides to do anything at all other than power strips, then he and his landlord are looking for an electrician. His electrician might use wiremold (although doubtful), but VAP won't be.
 
  #22  
Old 09-28-05, 05:05 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,287
John, the reason I suggested that site is because the first thing you pull up on their residential section is powerstrips. They do have D.I.Y. items.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'