Pipe & Wire?

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Old 09-27-05, 10:09 PM
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Pipe & Wire?

Am building a new bath and kitchen in the basement. Since they share a common wall, what restrictions or common practices are there about the plumbing and wiring sharing a given stud space?

Also, is there any reason why I couldn't put the range hood on the GFCI with the utility outlets?

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 06:43 AM
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There are no restrictions regarding pipes and cables in the same stud cavity. You cables will be attached (stapled) to the studs, so there shouldn't be any issues.

Personally I wouldn't GFCI protect a range hood. But you can.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 10:39 AM
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You may not put the range hood on the same circuit as the one serving countertop receptacles.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 01:51 PM
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...On to the outlets...

What other restrictions might there be on what goes on the same circuit as the convenience outlets? My local inspector says no more than three outlets on the circuit, but didn't mention anything else.

He also indicated that the microwave must have its own circuit. Is this common elsewhere?
 
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Old 09-28-05, 03:30 PM
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Microwave ovens need power. It is a good idea to put the microwave on its own circuit even if not required. It would be required if it were built in or if its directions specifically call for a dedicated circuit.

The bathroom must either be on it's own 20 amp circuit completely, or it's 20 amp receptacle can be on the same 20 amp circuit with other bathroom receptacles, but only other bathroom receptacles.

You must have two 20 amp circuits serving the kitchen counter top receptacles. As John stated, these must not supply the range hood. They may also not supply the lights anywhere, or other receptacles.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 03:47 PM
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Your username "Yukon" suggests you might be in Canada? If so the codes are similar, but not the same as in the States. There are a few Canadian electricians who frequent this board, and you might want to wait for their advice.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 05:28 PM
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O.K. Here's the Plan

Nope, only wannabe in Canada, usually starting about April. Anything above 65 degrees and I start thinking about moving... But, I guess I'll stay in Missouri.

I plan two countertop outlets and one on the end of the counter cabinet on the same GFCI circuit. Can I add the over-sink light, too? I have dedicated fridge and micro circuits. The bath has a single ckt for outlet and light. The kitchen ceiling light is on with a few other lights. I'm not too thrilled with the idea of running a new ckt just for the hood and everything else is full.

Any suggestions?

By the way, thanks for the help.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 05:49 PM
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To meet code you need two counter top circuits. No lights can be on these circuits. The over the sink light and the range hood can be on the ceiling light circuit if you want.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 07:10 PM
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Yukon, kitchens are very highly regulated places. If you're doing wiring in a kitchen, there's a hundred things you need to know. Q&A isn't going to cut it. You won't ask all hundred, and we won't think to tell you all hundred. And the chances of you getting it all right by accident are zero. I suggest you visit the electrical aisle at Home Depot and spend $6 on a green paperback titled Wiring Simplified. Read it all.
 
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Old 09-29-05, 01:35 PM
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Thanks for the comments, everyone.

I can appreciate the complexities of kitchen regulations, but I also like to get ideas from the folks to do the work as well as the folks who make the rules. It seems to me there is always some insight to be gained.

Fortunately, I have found some room on another circuit I can juggle with to get all in place. Unfortunately, I am left with some parallel runs over longer distance than I had hoped. But, hey, it's all invisible under sheet rock, right?

I must say, I am quite curious about a requirement for two circuits for countertop outlets. My local inspector says it's not required here, so I'm good. But I still can't imagine why such a requirement. There must be some qualifiers to it because, for example, one outlet, two circuits? I don't think so. What's the reasoning?

Thanks again. I'll be done this weekend.
 
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Old 09-29-05, 01:44 PM
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I believe that the issue of two countertop circuits is so that there is adequate power for the appliances that are used. Coffee makers, electric frying pans and griddles, toasters, toaster ovens, all use electricity. The NEC wants to avoid the situation where someone is tempted to put a 30 amp breaker in place so that the 20 amp circuit doesnít trip due to the high load.
 
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Old 09-29-05, 01:44 PM
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The code is a set of compromises. Two small appliance circuits in small kitchens might be too many. Two small appliance circuits in large kitchens might be too few. Not wanting to complicate the code even more by having a lot of rules about kitchen size, they just settled on two as being correct for most kitchens.

It's pretty much this way thoughout the code. It's too strict for some situations and too lenient for others. But that's life.

I'm surprised that your inspector says it's not required where you are. That's the first I've heard of such an exemption in the U.S.
 
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Old 09-29-05, 02:22 PM
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Since it's in a basement, is this a small kitchen like a kitchenette or wetbar? Perhaps the inspector is letting you get away with reduced power because the home already has a primary kitchen where the turkey fryer, convection oven, and chop-o-matic will be plugged in.
 
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Old 09-30-05, 06:32 PM
rocmay
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kitchen

Best i know on this is two dedicated , and gfi for mico. and of coarse a diffrent one close to water. Where i live the microwave has to be a orange or red outlet.
 
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