installing a gfci to a single-pole switch?

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  #1  
Old 10-09-05, 08:25 PM
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installing a gfci to a single-pole switch?

How do you install a gfci to a 3-wire cable, after a single-pole switch? My intention is to protect a run that includes a lamp post and receptacles w/ low V
lights.
 
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Old 10-10-05, 04:26 AM
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Describe the entire setup. I'm not sure what you want to do is possible, at least not in the manner you are suggesting.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-05, 05:17 AM
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You don't want to install a GFCI downstream of the switch.

GFCI protection for _any_ number of conductors in a complete circuit (including the combination switched and unswitched conductors sharing a neutral) is _possible_, but it requires non-standard equipment, including a GFCI with external sense coil, an external contactor, an probably a certain amount of design time by a professional engineer who could give you certified plans to show the electrical inspector.

Your best bet is to install the GFCI _upstream_ of the switch.

Connect the neutral in your three wire cable to the neutral terminal on the _load_ side of the GFCI.

Pigtail one of the switch terminals, the unswitched hot in the three wire cable, and the 'hot' terminal on the _load_ side of the GFCI.

Connect the switched hot to the second switch terminal.

You can even install a combination GFCI switch, such as the Leviton 5299; this puts the GFCI into the same box as the switch, so that you don't need an extra junction box.

If you explicitly do not want the extra receptacle in the circuit, then use a 'blank fact GFCI' upstream of the switch.

-Jon
 
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Old 10-10-05, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by winnie
You don't want to install a GFCI downstream of the switch.

GFCI protection for _any_ number of conductors in a complete circuit (including the combination switched and unswitched conductors sharing a neutral) is _possible_, but it requires non-standard equipment, including a GFCI with external sense coil, an external contactor, an probably a certain amount of design time by a professional engineer who could give you certified plans to show the electrical inspector.

Your best bet is to install the GFCI _upstream_ of the switch.

Connect the neutral in your three wire cable to the neutral terminal on the _load_ side of the GFCI.

Pigtail one of the switch terminals, the unswitched hot in the three wire cable, and the 'hot' terminal on the _load_ side of the GFCI.

Connect the switched hot to the second switch terminal.

You can even install a combination GFCI switch, such as the Leviton 5299; this puts the GFCI into the same box as the switch, so that you don't need an extra junction box.

If you explicitly do not want the extra receptacle in the circuit, then use a 'blank fact GFCI' upstream of the switch.

-Jon
thank you for your time, I realize if I put the gfci before the switch that would protect the total run. My situation has a switch mounted in a box already, and three wire going to another box and ending there. I am going to pick up the run at that point and wire a light post and some outlets using the switch just for the light post. I just wanted to protect the complete run w/ a gfci after the switch which I realize isn't possible.
 
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