Tapping into Existing Outlets

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  #1  
Old 10-10-05, 01:27 PM
jlaveck
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Tapping into Existing Outlets

I've browsed through some of the questions/answers here, and this seems like a good place to ask, so here it goes:

I am converting part of a closet to a work/desk area, and need electrical outlets on the closet side. There is an outlet on the other side of the wall, so is it possible to add a box on the opposite side and tap into the wiring? It sounds easy enough to do myself... Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-10-05, 01:53 PM
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Maybe. What room is on the other side of the wall? Is that receptacle always on or switched? What is already on that circuit, in other words, can it support the load you intend to add?
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-05, 02:01 PM
jlaveck
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I have 2 projects, same situation. In one, the outlet is in the same room as the closet. It is always on. In the other, the outlet is in another bedroom, also always on. Neither gets used much (maybe the vacuum), but could have a radio or similar plugged in at some point.
 
  #4  
Old 10-10-05, 02:05 PM
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You need to consider more than just the receptacle you want to tap. What else is on those entire circuits? Also, what do you intend to plug into these new receptacles?
 
  #5  
Old 10-10-05, 02:18 PM
jlaveck
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I'm not entirely sure what's on the circuit right now, but I'm fairly certain it's the same things that will be plugged into the circuit going forward, just in different locations within the room(s): PC, printer, TV, VCR, phone, fax and a few lamps (those are on switches).
 
  #6  
Old 10-10-05, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaveck
I'm not entirely sure what's on the circuit right now...
This is information that you SHOULD know. It could save your life some day. Before proceeding with this project, I suggest you take a few hours and COMPLETELY map out the entire electrical system. You need to know what receptacles, lights and appliances are on each and every circuit.

You do not want to overload the circuit by ending up with too many items on the same circuit.

As for the devices you mentioned, be warned: Computers and the other electronic equipment you mention need space. You do not want these items left turned on inside a small closet that does not have air moving. At best you will cause them to run hotter than normal and shorten their life. At worst they will overheat and start a fire. Please allow adequate air circulation and use a smoke detector.
 
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Old 10-10-05, 02:57 PM
jlaveck
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Thanks, racraft. Very good points. We should be OK with the ventilation since there will be no doors on the closets, but I will work on mapping the circuits before I proceed.
 
  #8  
Old 10-10-05, 03:21 PM
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There is no code issue with what you ant to do. As has been already stated the only potential problem is if the added load will overload the circuit.
 
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