sub panel for barn

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  #1  
Old 10-15-05, 07:31 AM
kim
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sub panel for barn

I have one 14-2 wire which comes into the barn from the main panel in the house. How many light and receptacle circuits can I run off of that one wire 20amp breaker? Can I just put in a junction box or do I need to put in a subpanel? I need to run at least four circuits. This is a small 24ft by 18ft barn with four seperate rooms and I would like to put at least 2 lights, one switch, and two receptacles(always hot), in each room. We will be using circular saws, saws alls, and other small power tools. I will be running all this wire in conduit. I live in Wisconsin. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Kim
 
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  #2  
Old 10-15-05, 07:37 AM
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None! You CANNOT feed this wire off a 20 amp breaker. #14 is rated at 15 amps max.

What you want to do is seriously flawed with only one 14/2 cable.
You CANNOT feed a sub-panel with it and it will only provide you with one circuit of 15 amps (1800 watts) maximum, 12 amps (1440 watts) continuous.
Depending on the distance you will even have trouble running two tools at the same time, especially with any lights on.
BTW- A circular saw is not a "small" tool. Most draw up to 15 amps at full load.

Why did you run only one 14/2 for a shop???
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-05, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by kim
I have one 14-2 wire which comes into the barn from the main panel in the house. How many light and receptacle circuits can I run off of that one wire 20amp breaker? Kim
Are you sure it's a 14-2 cable? If it is, then you need to change out the breaker to 15 amps. It's a code violation to have 14-2 cable protected with a 20 amp breaker.


Originally Posted by kim
Can I just put in a junction box or do I need to put in a subpanel? I need to run at least four circuits.Kim
Sounds like a subpanel is the way to go.

What's the linear distance from your house's main panel to the far end of the barn? Need to know this for voltage drop purposes.
 
  #4  
Old 10-15-05, 11:37 PM
kim
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The 14-2 wire is pre-existing. The wire that comes into the barn is approx 150ft from the house main. This distance is a little high, and with guessing at the route the wire takes underground between the house and barn. I will check again on the wire size in the morning. If I have to run new wire from the main box to the barn how deep does the wire have to be burried and what size wire should be ran from a 20 amp breaker.

Kim
 
  #5  
Old 10-16-05, 08:56 AM
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Forget the 20 amp breaker. You need to go with a sub panel for the loads you want to use. You want at least a 30 amp 240 volt sub panel, although I would recommend a 60 amp 240 volt sub panel.
 
  #6  
Old 10-16-05, 06:16 PM
kim
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sub panel for barn

Ok guys the wire coming into the barn is 12-2 metalic so how many circuit can I make off of that using 14-2 wire? This barn has four small rooms and I want to put a light and a receptacle in each room. I will be in one room at a time. I don't have to have all the lights in all rooms lit at the same time. So is it possible to make these four runs?
 
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Old 10-16-05, 06:36 PM
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You can make it run anything you want. There is no limit to how many receptacles are on a circuit.
You CANNOT use #14 on a circuit with #12 wire on a 20 amp breaker.
If you are intent on using this circuit, use #12 wire, install whatever you need and just live with the breaker tripping on occassion.
 
  #8  
Old 10-17-05, 05:02 AM
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Kim,

What we are telling you is that you have a limited amount of power with only a 15 amp circuit (and your circuit should be switched back to a 15 amp breaker).

You indicated in your original post that you want to run power tools ("circular saws, saws alls, and other small power tools"). I suspect that you may not even be able to run one of these under load given the distance you are from the main panel.

As Speedy wrote, you can put as many lights and receptacles as you want on the circuit. Simply placing a light or receptacle won't use any power. However, having the lights on and using power will draw current. And current is what you don't have much of.

Before you spend any money running wires in this barn for lights and receptacles, you should very seriously consider running a larger wire to the barn and then installing a sub panel.

At the very least, if you do not do this and instead you simply add lights and receptacles, I suggest you do so in a manner in which they can easily be routed to a sub panel. You will eventually want to make the switch for more power, or the next owner of the property will.
 
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Old 10-17-05, 08:21 AM
kim
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Thanks to all for your help

I want to thank everyone for taking the time to answer my questions. I will take everyones helpfull advise into consideration before deciding which way to go.

Kim
 
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