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Bonding Copper Water Pipes when water comes into house in PVC

Bonding Copper Water Pipes when water comes into house in PVC

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Old 10-20-05, 07:46 AM
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Bonding Copper Water Pipes when water comes into house in PVC

My father is finishing his new house, and needs to bond his copper water pipes used within his home.

Water is brought into the home by PVC pipe. Once inside, the change is made to copper, which is then used throughout the house for both cold and hot water.

At the water heater, dialetric unions were installed to make the transition from copper to steel pipe.

Q. Is there a particular place he is required to bond the pipes, or can he connect the bond wherever it's convenient (reference again that water enters the house via PVC, then transitions to copper)?

Q. Does he need to run separate bonding wires from the panel box for the cold and hot lines, or can he bond directly to one and then a jumper to the other?

Q. Regarding the dialetric unions--Does a jumper have to be installed over them, or does the fact that the water heater itself is grounded cover the short (less than 1') section of steel pipe at the water heater?

Q. What size wire does he need to use?

Q. I'm assuming he needs to run the bonding wires to the main panel, even though there is a sub panel which would be easier to run to, correct?
 
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Old 10-20-05, 08:06 AM
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Use #6 bare copper wire for the purpose; if possible, connect the Bonding conductor to the necessary points as one continuous lenth from end-to-end, without any "breaks, joints, or splices in between. This requires careful planning.

Consider Bonding-to-Ground the gas-pipe main if the service-line is PVC, and, if any, metal duct-work.

Connect the Bonding-Conductor to the Neutral terminal-bar in the SERVICE PANEL, for a "direct" connection to the Grounding Electrode Conductor, and for conducting "Fault-Currents" directly back to the "source".

Best to purchase what you need from an electrical supply-house- they will have catalogs showing all the various clamps/connectors available.

Good Luck, and Learn & Enjoy from the Experience!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Old 10-20-05, 12:41 PM
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For a typical 200 amp service a #4cu is required for a water bond.
Be sure to jump around any breaks in the copper run, such as plastic filters, softeners, etc.
With plastic feeding the house the bond points just need to remain accessible, you can make the connections anywhere.

You normally don't need to jump from hot to cold since there are many areas where they are continuous, such as mixing valves, etc. It is no problem if you do though.

In my area the POCO does NOT want their gas piping bonded. The ground from the branch circuits feeding any electric applainces is bond enough. I would check with them for confirmation.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 08:08 PM
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Thanks for the replies.

Dad's service is 225A, and is fed by 3/0 Copper.

If I am understanding what I read (from the NEC2005 "Pocket Guide to Residential Electrical Installations), table 250.66 determines the size of the required bonding jumper, thus requiring, as Petey stated, #4 Cu. Am I on the right track?

Does this wire have to be bare, or can insulated wire be used?


Still wondering about the dialectric unions--Do they constitute a break that needs to be jumped around? If so, would it be necessary to use #4 Cu for that too?
 
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Old 10-21-05, 09:31 AM
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The purpose of connecting a Bonding conductor is to (1), to "set" the Bonded metallic surface at "Ground" potential, and (2), conduct a "Fault-current" (F-C) back to the "source",i.e., the panel where the circuit-breaker (C-B) that protects the circuit with the "fault" is located.

The magnitude of the F-C depends on the rating of the C-B protecting the conductors. Obviously, the F-C in a conductor protected by a 400 amp C-B will be much larger than the F-C in a conductor protected by a 15 amp C-B., and the size of the Grounding/Bonding conductor is based of the rating of the C-B protecting the circuit-conductors.

Tbl. 250.122 is referred to for sizing the Grounding conductor.
 
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Old 10-21-05, 02:21 PM
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PAT, at the risk of nit picking, the water bond in a one or two family dwelling is based on 250.66 as per 250.104. The chart is based on service conductor size, not CB rating.
 
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