Barn Elecrical panel

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-20-05, 12:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 113
Barn Elecrical panel

I plan to install a seperate panel in my barn, a minimum of 100 amp, this service will be on a seperate meter from the house. My question there is no water to the barn thus no water pipes to ground to. Will a copper ground road be sufficient to properly ground the panel?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-20-05, 12:25 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
No. But two might be.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-05, 12:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 113
Thanks, I will use two, what size bare copper to i need to run from the panel to the rods?
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-05, 12:38 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Two ground rods 5/8 inch by 8 feet long at least six feet apart, connected using #6 (I believe) copper wire.
 

Last edited by racraft; 10-20-05 at 12:54 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-20-05, 01:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 170
Just out of curiosity, why are two rods better than one long one? My local power company uses a single rod to ground their electric pole at my house. They came around a few years ago and went down something like 25 to 30 feet with it to improve lighting protection. TIA
 
  #6  
Old 10-20-05, 02:39 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,342
Originally Posted by Polydorus
Just out of curiosity, why are two rods better than one long one? My local power company uses a single rod to ground their electric pole at my house. They came around a few years ago and went down something like 25 to 30 feet with it to improve lighting protection. TIA
A longer rod is probably better in reality as is it more likely to reach wet/moist ground, but it would be very difficult to drive such a long rod without special equipment and a bucket truck. Two 8 foot rods are much easier to install and one 20 foot rod. Of course that depends wholly on the geology of the surrounding area; many localities have different grounding rules based on the regional soil properties.

The best type of building grounding is actually a UFER where the rebar of the cement foundation is all bonded together with the grounding system.
 
  #7  
Old 10-22-05, 07:21 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 170
Thanks for the info. The power company didn't use a 20 foot rod. I think they were 8 feet and they used a coupler of some sort. They had a portable compressor and a jack hammer in they back of a pickup. They placed a coupler on the existing rod and kept adding sections until the rod stopped moving downward. They said this was indicated when the rod stopped and the top began to spread out. BTW this was Consumers Power about 25 miles south of Lansing.
 
  #8  
Old 10-22-05, 03:33 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,342
We have to just about be neighbors then. I'm in Mason, so you can't be too far away at 25 miles south of Lansing.
 
  #9  
Old 10-22-05, 05:24 PM
Hellrazor's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Eastern USA
Posts: 1,038
I drive ground rods in with my palm nailer, works like a charm.
 
  #10  
Old 10-23-05, 10:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 170
Originally Posted by ibpooks
We have to just about be neighbors then. I'm in Mason, so you can't be too far away at 25 miles south of Lansing.
Just over the line into Jackson County.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'