continue a run from BX to NM

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-27-05, 04:47 PM
tkuhrt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
continue a run from BX to NM

I have some BX 14/2 running in my house and I want to add some outlets in another room. Do I have to continue with BX or Can I use NM 14/2 to continue? I understand the BX casing is the ground, but would it be fine if I ground the NM in a metal box?

thx for your time.
 

Last edited by tkuhrt; 10-27-05 at 05:14 PM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-27-05, 05:40 PM
tkuhrt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Anyone? I didnt think this would stump anyone.
 
  #3  
Old 10-27-05, 06:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
No, it's not a hard question. I think you just didn't give it enough time.

If NM-B is allowed by your city, and if you can provide physical protection for it (i.e., don't leave it exposed), then you can use NM-B. The NM-B has its own grounding wire, and is usually installed in plastic boxes with the grounding wire connected to the switches and receptacles. Your existing BX may or may not be providing ground.
 
  #4  
Old 10-27-05, 06:33 PM
tkuhrt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the reply, but Im not sure that answers my question. The BX casing is the ground wire if I am not mistaken.

I would like to continue a run by adding an outlet and maybe a light to an already existing BX line. Can I use NM If I connect the ground wire to the metal box that the BX ended in?
 
  #5  
Old 10-27-05, 06:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
As long as the box is grounded, which you can check with a voltmeter, then yes.
 
  #6  
Old 10-28-05, 05:12 AM
HandyRon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 1,365
What type of BX (really called AC cable) do you have? The older style without a metallic bonding strip within the armor, or does it have the metal strip?

No strip, no ground. Do not extend the circuit.
 
  #7  
Old 10-28-05, 10:44 AM
tkuhrt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
a house built in the 50's, so I think it is the old stuff.
 
  #8  
Old 10-28-05, 01:33 PM
HandyRon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 1,365
The National Electric Code, does not recognize AC cable without a bonding strip as suitable for grounding. So if your adding receptacles, which in most jurisdictions is new work, then you would need to comply with current code for the new receptacles. Current code requires a ground for new circuits.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'