water pump & furnace hookup to generator

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Old 10-28-05, 02:04 PM
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water pump & furnace hookup to generator

I have a water pump that runs on a 15 amp 110 circuit. I have a natural gas fired boiler with electronic ignition that runs on another 15 amp 110 circuit. I have a 5200 watt running capacity Coleman generator with 3 20 amp outlets.
The furnace and pump are hard wired into boxes just below receptacle boxes with a cut out switch in between. Would it not be permissible to connect these with plugs and plug them into receptacles to run and into the generator when power goes out? Is the hard wiring necessary for a specific reason or code? Wouldn't the ability to unplug it serve the same purpose as the switch? I live in Ontario.

thanks
 
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Old 10-28-05, 02:30 PM
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I'm not familiar with Canadian codes. But elsewhere, that is a great solution.
 
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Old 10-28-05, 06:06 PM
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No, it would not be. You need transfer switches (either a single one for all your hardwired circuits, if your generator has a suitable plug, or one per wired appliance).

In Ontario, you have to switch neutral as well as hot from the utility, after where the utility neutral is bonded to gound.
 
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Old 10-28-05, 07:25 PM
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If he unplugs the water pump from the regular utility branch circuit and plugs it into the generator receptacle, that effectively switches the neutral.
Same with the furnace.
 
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Old 10-29-05, 12:32 AM
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Handy Ron is correct

I have done just what was described by the original
poster.

You may wish to consider using " twist lock " plugs and
outlets so though so that you have a good solid connection.
 
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Old 11-01-05, 05:23 AM
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Two different answers, not exactly what I was hoping for. Thanks for the help but I'll pose the question to an electrician from my area. I have to bring one in to put COPALUM crimp connectors on some aluminum wiring connections that I have.
 
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Old 11-01-05, 07:54 AM
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In general, there is no good and safe way to add a plug to a device designed to be hardwired.
 
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Old 02-07-09, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by oldgeeser View Post
If your Generator is grounded, and has sufficent wattage to run the appliances .. there shouldn't be any problem...
have a look here
oldgeeser
The link you provided is not in accordance with electrical codes. 422.12 of the 2008 NEC states that central heating equipment shall be supplied by an individual branch circuit, and cutting lines to attach cord caps is an improper installation. The only correct way to achieve this is by utilizing an approved transfer switch. I am closing this thread and deleting your posted link due to the hazards imposed.
 
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