wiring problem

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  #1  
Old 10-31-05, 06:54 AM
dyang
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wiring problem

Please help me with my wiring problem. My friend messed up the wiring behind a ceiling light. Now the light and a couple of wall outlets are down.
There are three holes with with wires in the junction box behind the light.
Hole 1 has two white ( not very sure as the cover is sort of worn out) and a black wire;
Hole 2: a white and a black;
Hole 3: a white and a black.

All three black are originally connected. My problem is how I should connect the four white wires so that the light and outlets will work.

Please help me out. My kids are crying and my wife is complaining. Thank you so much.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-31-05, 07:24 AM
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More white wires than black wires is very unusual. What do you mean that "the cover is sort of worn out"? Does this somehow prevent you from being sure about the color of the wires? Sometimes wires get covered with drywall texturing spray, and non-white wires look white. So check carefully.

In what city do you live, and in what year was your house built?
 
  #3  
Old 10-31-05, 07:35 AM
dyang
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Thanks, John

Thanks John for willing to help me.
I am not sure about the color. There are three wires coming from this hole. One black is connected with other blacks from the other two holes. There are two wires open from this hole. They look different from the black wire.
I live in Toronto. Our house is about 40 years old.

The other two holes have two wires each, a black and a white. This hole has three wires ( is this for the light switch?)
Help me out if you can, John. Thanks so much.
 
  #4  
Old 10-31-05, 07:48 AM
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This suggestion presumes this is a switch-controlled outlet with---- 2 "feed-out", 2-conductor cables, each cable with a Black/White wire---- 1 "Feed-in" cable with 3 conductors, Black/ White/Red, and The Red wire, possibly not indentified as such, is switch-controlled.

The Black/White "Feed-in" pair will test for a "constant" 120 volts across the pair.This test is best performed by connecting a simple lamp-socket to the wires.The lamp-socket will switch "On-Off" when connected to the Red (?)wire and the White wire.

Itis noted that the White wire is "common" to both the Black & Red(?) wires. Lamp connected to Black& White = lamp "ON" without interruptions------ lamp connected Red & White = lamp "On/Off" with the switch.

I suggest you verify this as your first-step.

Good Luck, & Learn & Enjoy from the Experience!!!!!!!!!
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-05, 07:50 AM
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You need to figure out which cable goes to the switch. An ohmmeter can do this. Do you have an ohmmeter (a standard feature of multimeters)?
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-05, 08:22 AM
dyang
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Hi, Pattbaa and John,
I really appreciated your help.
The outlets are not switch-controlled. There is only one switch involve here and it is for the light.

I made the light working in a couple of ways of connetion, but the outlets were all out.

I can find which cable is connected with the switch. Then what should I do?
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-05, 08:24 AM
dyang
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I drew a picture to show current layout in the box. You can find it at
http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/wiring.jpg

All three blacks are connected originally. They should be fine. The problem is the remaining 4 wires (they look different from the black ones)
 
  #8  
Old 10-31-05, 12:11 PM
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Location: port chester n y
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Presuming this is "standard" color-coding,and with the 3 "White" wires seperated, connect the lead of a lamp socket to the 3 Blacks, then with the loose-lead of the socket, test to the 3 loose & seperate "White" wires.

A "White" wire connection that results in the lamp "On" without interruption indicates the "Feed-IN" Black & White cable-pair.

A "White" wire connection that results in a "On/Off" lamp operation when the switch is operated indicates the "switch-lead" that will connect to the Black fixture-lead.

.
 
  #9  
Old 10-31-05, 01:40 PM
dyang
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Talking

Thank you so much, PATTBAA.
I will test this for sure.
Do you think this is what you suggested me to do
http://www.indepthinfo.com/wire-swit...houtlet.shtml?

Wiring a Switch with Light in Middle of Circuit

Thanks. You are great!!!
 
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