Adding a wall outlet?

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  #1  
Old 11-01-05, 10:22 AM
Geoff
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Adding a wall outlet?

I am in the process of getting my cable modem / router wiring "hidden", and have settled on a top shelf in a large closet / pantry as the best spot.

I can easily run wires into the attic as necessary, and two main rooms requiring connects are separated by the closet.

My only problem is getting power for the cable modem and router inside the closet. There is a wall outlet on an exterior wall about 3' away, and this closet / pantry is in the kitchen (fan wiring in attic above?).

What is the best way to add an outlet there? Will I need to get permits for this kind of work?

I'm a total newbie at home repair, so speak slowly =)

Thanks,

- Geoff
 
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  #2  
Old 11-01-05, 10:33 AM
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I cant answer about adding an outlet, but my first question is have you actually tried the router in this location and are you comfortable with the range. Typically they work best line-of-sight and up high (radio waves tend to fall downward), but going through walls and doors can impede the signal.
 
  #3  
Old 11-01-05, 10:37 AM
Geoff
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Originally Posted by ds7771
I cant answer about adding an outlet, but my first question is have you actually tried the router in this location and are you comfortable with the range. Typically they work best line-of-sight and up high (radio waves tend to fall downward), but going through walls and doors can impede the signal.
Yes, this location is both central to the most important areas, and also up high. The router is currently located about 5 feet away (on the floor) of where its new location would be. Performance is fine ..
 
  #4  
Old 11-01-05, 10:58 AM
assemblo
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Ahhhhh

It sounds like your best bet would be to add a jumper from the outlet on the opposite wall and add your outlet. If I understand you correctly this can be done without much trouble. If the walls are back to back just cut your hole where you want your new outlet( the closer it is to the old outlet the better) and add your wire.
 
  #5  
Old 11-01-05, 11:12 AM
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Location: Central New York State
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Do not just "cut your hole where you want your new outlet." You must do your homework first.

What is presently on this circuit? If you donít know, you should. There are certain circuits you can't extend, and certain circuits you donít want to extend.

Is this circuit GFCI protected? It's outside, so it should be. If it's GFCI protected at the receptacle you want to tap it won't be an issue. However, it it's GFCI protected from another receptacle then you need to address this.

What do you plan on in addition to just the router and the cable modem? Do you have enough ventilation? Can you easily get a cable line to this closet? How about a phone line? While you donít need a phone line yet, you may someday want to switch to DSL, so if you're running lines, run them all.

Now as for extending the circuit that feeds the outdoor receptacle. If you decide that you can, and if you decide that you want to extend this circuit, you have be careful about how you do so.

You will need to cut an opening in the same stud cavity as the existing receptacle, but not directly back to back with the existing receptacle. Then you can use an old work box and run a short piece of cable (12-2 or 14-2, depending on the circuit breaker and existing wire size) from the line side of the existing receptacle (which should be GFCI, or you will replace it to be GFCI) to the new receptacle.
 
  #6  
Old 11-02-05, 12:20 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 278
Guys- He said "there is an outlet on an exterior wall". I don't think he meant that it is an outdoor receptacle.

Geoff-

Pick up a general wiring book at the hardware store. There are several nice ones for beginners with pictures and easy to follow directions. I am finding that many electrical upgrades are not as difficult as they were intimidating with lack of knowledge. Come back here with questions after that. What you want to do is really pretty simple once you do the homework racraft suggested.

The book should have an area that will show you how to chart your whole house wiring system, which will be very helpful in learning how it all works.
 
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