Ceilingjoist where fixture to hang

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  #1  
Old 11-04-05, 12:59 PM
Grizzle
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Ceilingjoist where fixture to hang

I am remodeling a laundry room. The ceiling fixture is off center in the room and sticks out like a sore-thumb. I went to shift it to center and discovered why it is off, there is a ceiling joist right where it should go. The last guy took the easy solution and shifted it over 6 inches.

I was watching some home-improvement show and they ran into the same problem. But they had to have the fixture on center. They said it made for a little more work but they could still place the fixture as planned. Of course, they didn't bother to explain what had to be done. They just showed the finished result.

So what can I do to hang a semi-flush mount fixture directly under a ceiling joist? FYI, I'm looking at 1/2 drywall over 100 year old true 2x6 joists on 16" centers.

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-04-05, 01:50 PM
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how many cables at the light fixture? If your lucky and there is only one, you can get a round shallow (1/2") pan box and screw directly to joist and enter cable in top.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 02:15 PM
Grizzle
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Thanks for the quick reply!

Yes. It is just the incoming 14/2 romex feed.

The 1/2" box, is that what is known as a "pancake" box?

If I run into this again and I have a line exiting the box too, could I still use this solution?
 
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Old 11-04-05, 03:20 PM
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What exactly do you mean by "semi-flush"? To me, that implies "partially recessed". Won't the joist be in the way of recessing the fixture?

This isn't an electrical problem at all. It's strictly a mechanical problem. Fluorescent fixtures (if this is a fluorescent fixture) don't need an electrical box at all, since they provide a compartment for electrical connections inside the fixture. Is the fixture fluorescent?

If you're willing to go with a surface fluorescent fixture, then just screw the fixture to the joist. Run the electrical cable through any available knockout on either side of the joist.

If you really need a recessed fixture, you might consider two fixtures, one on either side of the joist.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 04:03 PM
Grizzle
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Thank you for your reply, but you are reading too much into the question. Ceiling light fixtures are classified generally as flush mount, semi-flush and chandelier. A flush mount is any light fixture that is attached to the ceiling and hugs tight to the surface. A semi-flush unit hangs down slightly below an escutcheon that covers the box and you know what a chandelier is.

If this were a recessed fixture, then I would have a much bigger problem. But no, it is not a recessed "can" light. It is also not a fluorescent fixture. It is a hanging fixture that requires a box.

And so the question remains, can you fit (and does code allow) an inbound and outbound feed on a pancake box?
 
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Old 11-04-05, 04:41 PM
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If the fixture provides no wiring compartment, then the answer is no.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 05:32 PM
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Is the joist dead center of where you need the box. They make boxes that straddle joists. Check out this page. There are two of this type.

http://doityourself.com/store/ceilingfansupportbox.htm
 
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Old 11-04-05, 07:17 PM
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Be sure also that the fixture you are planning to use does not have a warning about requiring 90 degree wiring (it will say something about 60 degree wiring, 1985, etc.). Your house probably has the older wiring that is only rated 60 degree, unless it's been rewired since 1985 or so.

I've removed multiple fixtures with the 90 degree requirement from my 1975 home with 60 degree wiring. Some of the wiring looked a little toasted too.
 
  #9  
Old 11-04-05, 09:48 PM
cptkinguru
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I use a "saddle Box" that stradles the joists, and has enough room for more than one wire. This should solve your problem.
 
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