outside light/Receptical

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  #1  
Old 11-04-05, 01:37 PM
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outside light/Receptical

I need to install a light controlled my a switch and a receptical outside.(the switch is inside). Iwill be coming from the panelbox (in the basement) to the switch....back to the basement and outside to the receptical and to the light...i do not want the recpetical controlled by the switch...what are my options....do i need to run 2 circuits? I plan on using a weather proof box and uf cable outside....Do i need anything else?...Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 11-04-05, 02:14 PM
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To do this with cable routing the way you describe, you must use 14/3 (if a 15-amp circuit) or 12/3 (if a 20-amp circuit) from the light switch to the receptacle. The black wire can carry switched power to the light (bypassing the receptacle), and the red wire can carry unswitched power to the receptacle.

But I'm not sure why you must route the cable this way. You could use all 14/2 (or 12/2) by routing the cabling to the receptacle before going to the switch.

Either way will work.

The receptacle must be GFCI-protected. If you plan to leave unattended stuff plugged in, you must get an "in-use" cover for the receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 11-04-05, 02:31 PM
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Thanks...let me get this straight....Take power to the gfci 1st ...then up to the light and back to the switch By pigtailing before I connect to the Gfci?
 
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Old 11-04-05, 03:38 PM
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You have a lot of options. Let me use '-' to indicate a black/white cable, and '=' to indicate a black/red/white cable. So you could run the cable in any of the following ways:
  1. Power-receptacle-light-switch.
  2. Power-receptacle-switch-light.
  3. Power-switch=receptacle-light.
  4. Power-switch=light-receptacle.
  5. Power-light=switch-receptacle.
  6. Power-light=receptacle-switch.
  7. Power-receptacle-light, and receptacle-switch.
  8. Power-switch-light, and switch-receptacle.
  9. Power-light-switch, and light-receptacle.
Pick one, and then we can go into details.
 
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Old 11-04-05, 07:12 PM
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Thanks .... I think I would like to try #1....
 
  #6  
Old 11-04-05, 08:42 PM
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At the GFCI receptacle:
  • If you want to GFCI protect the light (your choice), then connect the incoming power black and white to "line hot" and "line white" respectively. Connect the cable to the light to "load hot" and "load white".
  • If you don't want to GFCI protect the light, then the connections depend on whether the GFCI device has one or two sets of line-side connections. If only one set, use a wire nut to connect both black wires to a black pigtail to the "line hot" connection, and another wire nut to connect both white wires to a white pigtail to the "line white" connection. If two sets, you can connect both black wires to the two "line hot" connections, and both white wires to the two "line white" connections.
At the light:
  • Connect black from the cable from the receptacle to white from the cable to the switch.
  • Connect black from the cable to the switch to black from the fixture.
  • Connect white from the cable from the receptacle to white from the fixture.
At the switch:
  • Connect black to one screw.
  • Connect white to the other screw.
Of course, connect all grounding wires and screws in each box, using pigtails if necessary.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 03:08 PM
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Thanks...It worked perfect...Is this the only time you can use a neutral wire as a hot?
 
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Old 11-09-05, 03:13 PM
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Thomas, you are not using a neutral wire as a hot wire. You are using a white insulated wire as a hot wire. This is allowed in certain situations when cable assemblies are used. It is not the only time it is allowed. It is also allowed, for example, when running a 240 volt circuit.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 04:09 PM
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Look at all the money people can save by being members of such a forum as this.
 
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