How to convert air compressor to 220V?

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  #1  
Old 11-07-05, 01:24 PM
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Question How to convert air compressor to 220V?

I have a Craftsman Professional compressor that I want to convert to 220V. I opened up the box where the cord goes. I see four terminals; two from the cord that say line and load, and two to the motor that say line and load.

Any ideas on this? I've been looking for the manual to the compressor but can't find it. If I have to I can order it from Sears.
 
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Old 11-07-05, 01:26 PM
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You can probably find the manual on-line at the sears (Craftsman) web site.
 
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Old 11-07-05, 02:23 PM
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Hmm, found the compressor but can't find the manual for it. This is the one: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...+%26+Inflators

I'll check later when I have more time...
 
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Old 11-07-05, 05:33 PM
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It may not be able to be converted.
If it can the motor will have a label similar to this
volts 120/240
amp 10/5
It will usually also have the wiring directions for 120 and 240. It sounds like your unit may not be convertible if it only has the four terminals you listed.
 
  #5  
Old 11-07-05, 06:10 PM
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The product spec sheet for your model does say that the motor is 120/240. I did not find the owners manual on-line. An electrician could figure this out by looking at the motor, or sears service could probably help/
 
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Old 11-07-05, 06:11 PM
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Weez,

According to the product sheet I saw only 120 volts listed for that unit.
Must have been looking at a different one.
The motor tag will say for sure.

The box you opened to see line and load is the pressure switch.
You need to open the cover on the motor itself.
Make sure it is unplugged.

Why would you want to convert it anyway? Are you having a problem with it?

According to Sears that unit draws 15 amps at 120 volts.
For 120 volt operation you should have a minimum 20 amp breaker with 12 guage wire to the plug.
Also you would need to have a minimum of a 12 guage for a short extension cord.
 
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Old 11-07-05, 08:30 PM
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Click on "spec sheet"
 
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Old 11-07-05, 09:06 PM
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After I cleaned my glasses, there it was.
Thanks 594.

That being the case to be sure it can be converted, 120/240 has to be written on the motor nameplate.
Again though, I'm curious as to why you want to run it at 240 volts.
 
  #9  
Old 11-08-05, 08:34 AM
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Thanks for the tips guys, I'll check at the motor.

Actually I will see how it performs this winter before I decide to confert it. My dad has a similar compressor. When his was 110V it had trouble starting up when it was cold. Now that he switched it to 220V it has no issues. If mine has no issues at 110V then of course there will be no need to convert it.
 
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Old 11-08-05, 07:18 PM
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Weez,

The reason that his motor failed to start when it was cold was that the wiring that served his compressor was likely undersized.
When you convert a motor to a higher voltage it does not increase its power.
What the higher voltage does is cause there to be less voltage drop.
If he were to have increased the wire size from his panel to the plug and the plug to the compressor he would have the same starting ability as when he converted to 220 volts.

The real issue is that by forcing the compressor to run when it is cold you are creating an incredible amount of wear.
What may work for you is what I do and that is to stick a magnetic mount heater on the compressor crankcase if yours is cast iron.
My unit is outside in 30 below temps and starts every time.
Another thing to consider is to use 20 weight non-detergent oil which will help starting over the normally used 30 weight non-detergent.
 

Last edited by GregH; 11-08-05 at 07:42 PM. Reason: sp
  #11  
Old 11-08-05, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH
My unit is outside in 30 below temps and starts every time.

If it's ever - 30 here, the LAST thing I'm gonna be concerned about is starting my air compressor.

Brrr....
 
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Old 11-08-05, 07:47 PM
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Ya, well I was going to elaborate on another cold weather trick I use but since you mentioned cold weather.

I have a gas powered compressor that when it gets really cold I use 0 weight synthetic in both the 5 hp Briggs AND the compressor.
I wouldn't say it starts every time but at least you can turn the motor over by pulling on the cord.
 
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