how to wire a ganged receptical

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  #1  
Old 11-08-05, 06:54 AM
whistlestop
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how to wire a ganged receptical

I want to extend an existing receptical circuit to supply power to a four duplex receptical gang. This will supply power to a model train layout. The gang outlets will be installed on the wood frame work under the layout. This is quite similar to home contruction and I have a special fabricated wooden beam to channel wires around the lay out.

I will be using 12-2 with ground romex. and am running a short conduit extension to get off the block wall and onto the wood frame work.

The devices are: DC transformer for track power.

a Digital command station for engine control

a sound system

Nothing else is on this circuit unless I want to run a dremel at the pre exiting outlets or a trouble light. These items are always religiously removed from the circuit for safty.

what is the accepted method to hook the four outlet together electrically.

or. am I pursuing an idea that is not acceptable by standard codes.

Thanks for any reply

Whistlestop

How do I
 
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  #2  
Old 11-08-05, 07:22 AM
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Wiring up four receptacles in the same box is electrically the same as wiring up four receptacles in four boxes (i.e., receptacle to receptacle to receptacle). The differences are that you'll use individual conductors inside the box rather than cable, and that the grounding wires will all be connected in one wire nut.

Why not just use one receptacle and a power strip?
 
  #3  
Old 11-08-05, 02:12 PM
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Have you considered a PlugMold or WireMold type of plug strip? It may fit your needs better.

You've mentioned that the wiring will be in a custom wooden raceway. That is perfectly fine so long as the receptacles are in approved electrical boxes. I think that is what you intend to do, but I wanted to emphasize the point that receptacles cannot be installed in wooden enclosures without a proper box and cover.

Instead of unplugging everything each night, you could install a switch in your multi-gang box that cuts power to all of the receptacles.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-05, 10:06 AM
whistlestop
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Originally Posted by ibpooks
Have you considered a PlugMold or WireMold type of plug strip? It may fit your needs better.

You've mentioned that the wiring will be in a custom wooden raceway. That is perfectly fine so long as the receptacles are in approved electrical boxes. I think that is what you intend to do, but I wanted to emphasize the point that receptacles cannot be installed in wooden enclosures without a proper box and cover.

Instead of unplugging everything each night, you could install a switch in your multi-gang box that cuts power to all of the receptacles.

The plug strip idea is a good one. I never thought of that. This is one reason why I decided to start a thread to get some ideas.

Yes I have the proper wiring box and accutually have it installed. The wire is installed but not hooked up yet.

I never considered wiring in a switch as a part of the gang. Another superb idea. For that, I would run power through the switch, pull the white and black from the adjacent plug and feed each into the switch connectors?

Q: As I apply power to each plug in the gang should I remove the romex covering and use just the single wires?

Q: Is there such a thing as parallel and series wiring in a 110V application.
I am kind of thinking here like a 1.5V battery... positives and negatives in line or parallel

It probably makes more sense and is easier to go with a plug mold and apply a switch to that. But it is nice to know how to wire up a gang box anyway.

Thanks for the input.
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-05, 10:39 AM
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When installing a normal single pole switch, you only run the hot wire through the switch. The neutral is either not run to the switch at all (for a switch loop) or is wire nutted in the box behind the switch.

The plastic covering of the NM cable extends just into the box. It is removed with six inches of each wire then exposed inside the box.

Using terms like parallel and series when talking about home wiring just confuses people. 120 volt devices are always wired in parallel. However, the cables can run serially from device to device, or the devices can all be in parallel, run from one location.

The terms positive and negative are not used when discussing alternating current (AC). Each hot wire is both a positive and a negative, 60 times each second.

Your questions suggest that you have not done your homework yet. Please purchase one or two good book on home wiring. Wiring Simplified is one that is very good. There are many things that have not even been mentioned in this post that you need to know. Books will help you understand all of this and will provide the answers you need to the questions you don;t yet know you should be asking.
 
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