adding switch in GFCI run

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Old 11-09-05, 10:02 AM
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adding switch in GFCI run

Hi All,

I added a GFCI to 2-wire romex (no ground) coming into my utility room, and added a regular receptacle off the load lines of the gfci. Off the recepticle, i feed the hot wire through a switch and then off to two GFCI outlets I added outside. Now I can flip on and off the GFCI's outside with the inline switch inside, and can therefore turn off and on the christmas lights that basically three gfci's behind them. They all test correctly, with the first shutting everything off on a test, and all show up as correctly wired. My question is whether it is okay to put a switch in between these GFCIs? I think i hear a high pitched sound coming from the first GFCI, barely audible, but it might be my imagination.

Thanks for advice
 
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Old 11-09-05, 10:30 AM
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Yes, you can have a switch.

If I were you I would one of two things. I would make the outdoor receptacles non-GFCI, as they already have GFCI protection, or I would rewire so that the outdoor receptacles are not GFCI downstream protected.

Having GFCI protection from more than one source will eventually confuse someone.
 
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Old 11-09-05, 10:37 AM
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thank you for your response, I am relieved at that.
So I didn't want to have the redundant GFCI's outside as they are $$$, but I thought a home inspector when I sell might say "no GFCI's in outdoor outlet", get that fixed. The GFCI inside is like 30 ft. away from the outdoor receptacle, and it's not obvious it is on the same circuit. Maybe I could put those cute stickers on the outdoor outlet that say GFCI protected even though the receptacles are standard ones?

I do have the "code-saver" plastic flip for the box outside, which already set me back $20!
 
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Old 11-09-05, 10:45 AM
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A good home inspector would verify GFCI protection with a tester, not by simply seeing or not seeing a GFCI receptacle. If an inspector did state that the outdoor receptacles were not-GFCI protected, you would simply counter that GFCI protection is provided earlier in the circuit.

As for your overall project. It was against code for you to extend this circuit. Ungrounded circuits cannot be extended. You should have started with a new run from the main panel either to the first new receptacle or to the original receptacle. You should do this now. If you chose not do this then you need to use the "No Equipment Ground" stickers on the receptacles. Those that aren't GFCI must also have the "GFCI Protected" stickers.
 
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