proper way to install outlet under sink???

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Old 11-12-05, 08:14 PM
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proper way to install outlet under sink???

What is the proper way to install an outlet under a sink? I am installing an instant hot under my sink. It requires a GFCI outlet. Do I need to use a waterproof enclosure? Should the enclosure be fed with UF cable? I was going to use a waterproof enclosure fed from the bottom using UF wire but wasn't sure how I would be required to secure the cable since the enclosure doesn't accept a cable clamp.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 08:17 PM
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Use a regular box fed with NM cable. I use a 4"sq box fed from the bottom with an "industrial" cover (raised cover) usually.

The area under a sink is NOT a wet location. If it is the receptacle is the least of your worries.
 
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Old 11-12-05, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by bold
What is the proper way to install an outlet under a sink? I am installing an instant hot under my sink. It requires a GFCI outlet. Do I need to use a waterproof enclosure? Should the enclosure be fed with UF cable? I was going to use a waterproof enclosure fed from the bottom using UF wire but wasn't sure how I would be required to secure the cable since the enclosure doesn't accept a cable clamp.
I'll give you a response so that you feel like a wanted person.

I have never heard of any special aplications for under sinks. Not unless they came up with something else to keep the inspectors busy about. Around here, a gfci is required to be for outlets withing= 6 foot of a sink. But that's it. Just a plain old outlet box and romex.

I think electrical codes are goofy, so don't get me going on this otherwise I will go into a rant and sound anti-government. Like, they make out knob and tube like it will burn your house down. Yet, they allow for sale, on the market, light fixtures to be sold, where the wires pass thru grommet holes next to each other and can get hot and melt. Stuff like that. Or, they will allow homeowners to wire up their house but not let handymen (someone who actually might know something about electricity) come over and do it for them.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 07:10 AM
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"Around here, a gfci is required to be for outlets withing= 6 foot of a sink."

Only applies to receptacles installed to serve the countertop surfaces. DOES NOT apply to receptacles under the sink.

"I think electrical codes are goofy, so don't get me going on this otherwise I will go into a rant and sound anti-government. Like, they make out knob and tube like it will burn your house down. Yet, they allow for sale, on the market, light fixtures to be sold, where the wires pass thru grommet holes next to each other and can get hot and melt. Stuff like that."

To be U.L. listed, the wires for a fixture must have the appropriate temperature rating. Then, the homeowner must adhere to the maximum rated wattage specified on the fixture.

"Or, they will allow homeowners to wire up their house but not let handymen (someone who actually might know something about electricity) come over and do it for them."

Nothing wrong with a handyman doing electrical work for the public, as long as he/she has a master electrician's license, is licensed as an electrical contractor and has the required general liability insurance.

There are a couple of web sites where electrical contractors post pictures of the stuff they find that was installed by "handyman" types. NEC rules and regulations are a lot like baseball rules and regs. Certainly, they are somewhat subject to interpretation and may even seem arbitrary to a non-professional, but the whole idea is to understand the intent of the rule. Like most ordinances, laws and regulations in this country, each was put in place to protect the average consumer from themself and from the hazards introduced by handyman types who are jacks of all trades, masters of none.

I am of the opinion (based on what I have been called in to correct) that government has an obligation to try to protect people from unlicensed and uninsured contractors who think they have sufficient knowledge about electrical, HVAC or plumbing.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:02 AM
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Bonehead, your information about GFCI required within 6 feet of a kitchen sink is very outdated. That hasn't been the code in the U.S. for many, many years.

Also, if you think electrical codes are goofy, perhaps you shouldn't be giving electrical advice. It's important to follow the electrical codes that make sense to us. It's even more important to follow the electrical codes that don't make sense to us, because that means that there is a hazard we don't even recognize.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:29 AM
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Let's try not to lose site of the original post and question.

If the specifications for the device call for a GFCI protected receptacle, then a GFCI receptacle must be used (or GFCI protection must be provided elsewhere).

I also suspect that this unit needs a dedicated circuit. Regardless, it cannot be on the same circuit as regular counter top receptacles.

However, it is not necessary to use UF cable or to use a waterproof box.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:32 AM
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So, which is it? Bonehead said GFCI required within 6' of a sink, alittle said that does not apply to under sink.

(This is ironic since I was going to wire a new receptacle under my sink tonight--last night I ran the Romex to the metal box. There was an outlet there before, presumably for a garbage disposal, although there isn't a G.D. in there now.)
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:38 AM
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I see no disagreement among the posts here. GFCI protection is not required for a receptacle under a sink, unless the manufacturer of whatever you are installing requires it, which is not common. I don't think anyone said anything different. Bonehead wasn't very clear in his post (and his information is not current anyway), but he meant 6 feet left and right, not up and down. That used to be the code years ago.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:40 AM
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The codes are not as illogical as you might think. It is very common for someone to have one hand on the toaster or electric skillet or microwave, and the other hand on the faucet. Note that most of the countertop type of appliances are not grounded. It certainly makes sense to protect those outlets. The only thing typically plugged in under the sink is the disposal, and it is grounded, and in most cases electrically isolated from the sink by the rubber mounting gasket. So a GFCI protection is not mandated by potential problems.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:40 AM
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OK, great! (I didn't really want to spend another $12--this rewiring project is adding up.)
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by bold
I am installing an instant hot under my sink. It requires a GFCI outlet.
According to the NEC (and Washington state rules too), if the maunfacuturer said a GFCI is required, then you MUST install one.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:54 AM
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So Timinindy, help us out here. To what does the "it" refer in "It requires a GFCI outlet." Does the water heater manufacturer specify GFCI?
 
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Old 11-14-05, 08:57 AM
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Bold is installing the 'instant hot' heater. I just butted in--I'm not installing anything under there at this time.
 
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Old 11-14-05, 10:17 AM
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Thanks for the correction. I got confused (which happens easily).
 
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Old 11-14-05, 06:46 PM
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Seeing that it was brought up that the code for requiring GFCI's within 6 foot of the sink is outdated?...then what is the current code in most areas?
 
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Old 11-14-05, 06:57 PM
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What code does your area follow?
 
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Old 11-14-05, 07:01 PM
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All receptacles serving a kitchen countertop must be GFCI protected, no matter how near or far from the sink.
 
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