Selecting the right GE breaker for table saw

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Old 11-21-05, 02:15 PM
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Question Selecting the right GE breaker for table saw

Hi! I have a GE panel and a 240 V, 15 A table saw needing its own circuit. I noticed there is a THQL2115 breaker that is meant for 120/240 V. Will that do for a 240 V saw? Thanks!
 
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Old 11-21-05, 02:22 PM
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What you need to determine is if this breaker is designed for your panel.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 02:58 PM
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Question I have a pile of THQLs that came with the panel

This is actually a subpanel which has not been energized yet. But it came with a collection of THQLs.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:11 PM
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What you need to determine is if this breaker is designed for your sub panel.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:41 PM
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How to do that

The breaker is not stocked by Lowe's or my favorite electrical store in Reno, NV. It is offered by various online retailers. How to determine suitability?
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:52 PM
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Hi! I have a GE panel and a 240 V, 15 A table saw needing its own circuit. I noticed there is a THQL2115 breaker that is meant for 120/240 V. Will that do for a 240 V saw?
As Bob said does this breaker fit your panel? BTW...THQL2115: Thick series Q-Line 2 pole 1inch 15 amp. It is HACR rated and would be fine for your saw if it fits your panel and if your saw will start on a 15 amp circuit and will not trip out the breaker under load.

Can you give us the specs on the saw motor? The panel cover specification sheet, usually on the inside door cover will list the breakers it accepts.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 04:42 PM
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Look at the panel. The specifications on the panel will identify which breakers are designed for that panel. If you see the breaker listed, then it is designed for the panel. If the breaker is not listed then it cannot be used with the panel.

As an alternative you can go to GEs web site and look there.

It is NOT as simple as seeing if the breaker fits. Going by fit alone is wrong and could cause a fire.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 09:12 PM
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Bob I did not mean for him to see if it will install in the panel. I meant for him to make sure that it "fits" by checking the specifications on the panel door spec. sheet. I suppose the word fit was a poor choice.
 
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Old 11-22-05, 04:24 AM
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Roger, Thanks for your clarification. Yes, I was thrown off by the word fit.
 
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Old 11-22-05, 03:33 PM
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Question Of panels, breakers, and motors.

Hi! The panel has a list of allowable GE breaker letter codes, which starts with THQL and goes on through more alphabet soup. I only have THQLs.
The motor information runs to 2 HP, 8.3 amps, 3450 rpms, 1 phase, 230 volts.
The reason for the original posting was to find out if a 120/240 breaker can serve a 240 motor. I imagine it could, the only difference being that there is no neutral wire. Correct?
On the subject of fitting breakers, the back clips of the breakers seem awfully tight to receive the fins from the panel bars. Most of them CAME with the panel, so I imagine they are supposed to fit. What kind of persuasion is allowable?
Thanks everybody.
 
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Old 11-22-05, 06:12 PM
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The panel has a list of allowable GE breaker letter codes, which starts with THQL and goes on through more alphabet soup. I only have THQLs.
Looks like the breaker will work in your panel. When a breaker is new they sometimes have a dielectric grease on the contacts and this facilitates the ease of snapping them in. You sort of rock them into postion if they have the
locking tabs. Insert the breaker into the panel hooking the metal rail into the breaker tabs then pivot them onto the bus. If they are stubborn to snap on make sure the are lined up properly with the bus fin (GE Panel). Then place your thumb on the breaker directly above the breaker compression contact and the bus fin. Push on the breaker, it should fasten to the bus. You can use some pretty good force but not overly severe.


The motor information runs to 2 HP, 8.3 amps, 3450 rpms, 1 phase, 230 volts.
Using table 430.148 and 12 amps FLC at 2 hp and 230 volts you need conductors for the branch circuit that are 12 x 1.25 = 15 amps.

So a minimum 14 awg copper branch circuit is required.

It will pull locked rotor amps on start up very briefly probably around 65 to 75 amps. I'm not much of a fan on 14 awg circuits for receptacles serving motors or hard wires for motors. I would install 12 awg copper and a 15 amp breaker on a dedicated circuit to that saw. If it wont run under load or start without tripping the breaker move to a 20 amp breaker. You are allowed to do this upsizing with limitations for motors. If it wont start and run under load on a 20 amp breaker suspect a problem with the saw motor. It is very rare that a saw with the specs like this one would need more than a 20 amp breaker.

The reason for the original posting was to find out if a 120/240 breaker can serve a 240 motor. I imagine it could, the only difference being that there is no neutral wire. Correct?
Yes
 
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Old 11-22-05, 06:42 PM
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Smile 10 awg

I did the dedicated circuit in 10 awg following a recommendation in the saw manual. Now all it needs is a nice new breaker. Thanks for all the help. This is a cool site.
 
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